Tag Archives: Wine

Summer Is Coming Wine Event With Wine Guy Mike

Join me for Summer Is Coming Wine Event With Wine Guy Mike. Scratch Catering will be serving delicious Charcuterie and Cheese selections to enjoy with an adventurous flight of 5 wines. This event is sure to deliver an evening of fun and learning all about new wines!

Wine Guy Mike Wine Events

Wine Guy Mike Wine Events

Celebrate Summer with a flight of 5 distinct wines of character and world class cured meats and organic cheese selections.

Scratch Catering Chacuterie and Cheese Platters

Event Date: May 18th, 2017 From 6:30pm-9:30pm

Where: Katie O’Keefe’s 2100 Stephens Ave, Missoula, Montana 59801

Ticket Price: $25.00 per person and you must be 21 years of age to purchase tickets and attend the event.

Purchase Your Ticket Now by Clicking This Link:  

Price: $25.00  

Detail: Tickets must be purchased no later that May 17th at 12:00 Noon. If you would like to attend and are unable to purchase tickets online you are welcome to join in the fun by contacting Wine Guy Mike at mike@wineguymike.com or call or text (this is best) at           406-370-7162

I will hope to see you there for this great evening of fun and learn all about wine!

From my table to yours,

Riedel Wine Glasses meet TRIbella Wine Aerator

Do Wine Glasses Make a Difference?

Selecting the right wine glass stemware will have a significant impact on your wine tasting experience.  This is the most frequently asked question I encounter while conducting wine tastings; Do wine glasses make a difference? The unequivocal answer is yes! Let me share with you some of the reasons why choosing the proper stemware to taste wine with will make your wine experience better.

First, let’s take a look at the elements of wine that are important to know about before we even take a sip. Whether you are a wine expert, wine aficionado, or a casual wine drinker there are two things any of these wine lovers attempt to discern and discuss; aroma and flavor.

Riedel Wine Glasses

Riedel Wine Glasses

Each grape varietal has its own unique relationship with fruit, acidity, alcohol, and tannin in a wine. Stemware made for each particular grape is designed to deliver wine to the mouth in a very deliberate fashion.

Shape Matters

A wine glass has three parts; the bowl, the stem, and the base. The height of the stem and the width of the base are the architecture of the glass. The bowl of grape-specific stemware will vary in size, shape, and diameter, the design of the rim will also vary.

The glass is designed to deliver the “message” of the wine to the 4 sensations humans are able to recognize.

  1. Aroma – how the wine smells
  2. Mouthfeel – the feeling of weight and texture of the wine
  3. Flavor – interaction of fruit, acid, bitterness, or minerality
  4. Aftertaste – this is the flavor that lingers after we taste the wine
Riedel wine Glass Tasting

Riedel Wine Glass Tasting

Stemware Design

The architectural design of glassware must be balanced in size, height, and width. The bowl of the glass must be proportional to the height of the stem and width of the base. This ratio ensures that the glass is harmoniously proportional, adhering to an architectural design from the Golden Age of Architecture. This design is based on a mathematical formula known as the Fibonacci sequence, in nature, it is referred to as the Golden Ratio.

Glasses adhering to these design standards are functional and also visually very pleasing to the eye.

How Does It Work?

The tip of the tongue recognizes sweetness, the middle saltiness, the sides of the tongue and cheek areas of the mouth sour, and the back of the tongue bitterness.

Varietal or grape specific stemware works like this; the perfectly designed glass allows the wine to meld harmoniously in a very specific way within the glass. This is why the bowl of each glass is shaped so differently, facilitating aroma, flavor, and sensations that are known to be correct according to the wines natural profile.

The shape of each wine glass bowl also allows a person to examine and determine color, structure and the density of individual wines.

Riedel Wine Glasses meet TRIbella Wine Aerator

Riedel Wine Glasses meet TRIbella Wine Aerator

Enter here to win your TRIbella aerator  Contest winners will be selected by TRIbella and WineGuyMike on July 5th 2016.

Varietal specific wine glasses feature two types of openings or rims of the glass, cut or rolled. The cut rim allows the wine to flow to the tongue, but the way it flows and hits the tongue is predicated by the shape of the bowl. When you lay a varietal specific glass with wine in it on its side you will see a shaped pattern in the wine.

This pattern is exactly the way the wine enters the mouth and hits your tongue.

A rolled rim is designed to inhibit the smooth flow of wine to the mouth, delivering the wine exactly as the winemaker intended. Again the manner in which the wine is delivered to the mouth is predetermined by the shape of the bowl and the style of the rim.

Think of the wine glass as a trajectory system that delivers aroma to the nose and flavor to the mouth exactly as it should for each and every grape type.

When I teach wine and stemware classes the real litmus test is having an individual taste wine first from an incorrect glass, and then pouring the remainder of the wine into a correct glass. Even the most experienced wine drinker is shocked at the dramatic difference in flavors and aromas between the right and wrong glass.

What to Drink from Now?

To summarize; It is true a wine cannot truly be analyzed from a non-specific glass. It doesn’t look, smell or taste like it was intended by the winemaker.

I have two suggestions, Riedel is the brand that I use and recommend. They make a purpose designed generic red and white wine glass. The other best option is to purchase varietal specific glasses for a few of the red and white wines you drink and serve most frequently.

Riedel Wine Glass Company

Riedel Wine Glass Company

Most of us think of wines that we drink as weekday, weekend, or special occasion. I recommend using the correct wine glasses for even weekday wines, it helps the wine to be the very best it can be.

For more information and help to select the right glasses email me at mike@wineguymike.com

Stop by the store and check out the products that Mike uses and recommends. 

From my table to yours,

Logo_WGM 180x180

 

International Lambrusco Day – WineGuyMike™ on ABC Montana

This week on Wine Time™ with WineGuyMike™ on ABC Montana I’m talking about Lambrusco. Why you might ask?  Because today, June 21st, is Lambrusco Day in Italy, and Lambrusco is one of the best wines to enjoy with food. Simple, fun, fizzy, refreshing, inexpensive, need I say more?

Lambrusco is one of Italy’s most popular wines. Do you remember one of television’s most famous of tag lines “Riunite on Ice, That’s Nice”? Yes that’s right your Grandma’s Lambrusco, Riunite, is still claiming to be the biggest selling Italian wine in history here in the United States.

Riunite Lambrusco was launched in the late 1960’s and what now seem like cheesy commercials ran on TV in the 70’s.  Cheesy or not that famous tag line is one of the most memorable ever, at least for those of us old enough to remember.  But the truth is this brand enjoyed one of the most well executed marketing campaigns ever.  That was yesterday, today Lambrusco has come of age and I’m here to share it with you.

There is not anything to complicated or technical that we need to know in our approach to buying, chilling, and drinking Lambrusco.  In fact Lambrusco is rather simple and ultimately the secret to a great Lambrusco is one that produces a great head of foam when you pour it, just like a great beer.  Selections will unfortunately be limited on your local shelves unless you live in an area that has a great wine shop.  If you live on the east coast you will have more choices better selections. Wherever you have a concentration of die-hard Italians like me that enjoy Lambrusco retailers will show this sparkling gem from Italy some love.

More and more you will find Lambrusco lovers who are so incredibly passionate about this frizzante wine from the Emilia-Romagna region in the heart of Italy that you just have to give it a try.

The Emilia-Romagna region is located between two of my favorite areas in Italy. Parma which is home to some of my favorite raw cow’s milk cheese Parmigiano-Reggiano, yet another wonder of the world I cannot live without.  On the other side of Emilia is probably one of the most iconic areas of Italy, Modena, and the birth place of Ferrari exotic sports cars.

Italian winemakers produce a large range of Lambrusco wines.  If you shop at a nice specialty shop and they take their wine program seriously it is somewhat safe to assume they have chosen a good selection of wines for you to purchase.  The best Lambrusco’s are going to be dry and made in a frizzante style.  There are three colors of fizzy Lambruscos: white (bianco), rose (rosato) and the classic red (rosso) ranging from sweet to bone dry.

Prosecco is another Italian favorite that is mainly produced as a sparkling wine in either the fully sparkling (spumante) or lightly sparkling (frizzante, gentile) styles.  Proseccos are labeled “brut”, “extra dry”, or “dry”, with the brut being the driest.  Ask you wine steward of the store you shop in for the driest Lambrusco in a frizzante style that they offer for sale.

Lambrusco is made using the Charmat method rather than the Champagne method, the French method of making sparkling wine.  The Charmat method is a second fermentation in pressurized tanks rather than in individual bottles.  The shorter, tank fermentation is preferable for Lambrusco because it preserves the freshness and the flavor of the grapes.

Unlike Champagne, Lambrusco does not ferment in the bottle consequently the wine goes off or gets old quickly and should be drunk as young as possible, preferably within one year.

What I love about Old World European wine is that they are a function of necessity.  The wines in each area are made to work with, match, or pair with the foods that are grown and raised in the region or area.  Lambrusco is no different and in the Emilia-Romagna region their food tends to be rich, salty and that is why Lambrusco works so well with the indigenous foods of the area.

Lambrusco wine is lively and bright with fruit, balanced out with naturally high acidity which pair perfectly with the rich salty food dishes from this area.  Lambrusco like all Old World style wines are not overdone, featuring lower percentage of alcohol which is also conducive to being a great wine to pair with food.

The really terrific thing to note about Lambrusco is that you will be hard pressed to ever find one more expensive than $20.00 and many are $8.00-$10.00.  Wow that works in this economy for my pocket-book.

Many bottles will list the Lambrusco grape variety from which it has been produced.  I’m not going to bore you with the 13-17 different Lambrusco grape varietals because there are only a handful you need to know.  Here is the short list; The most commonly found clones are the Grasparossa, Maestri, Marani, Monstericco, Salamino and Sorbara.  The rabid Lambrusco lovers, they love the Sobara version but any of these are ones that you want.  If you want to dig in a little deeper here is a link from my friends in Italy and their site which is solely devoted to Lambrusco; http://www.lambruscoday.org/facts-or-fiction.html

Here’s what you should expect from a good Lambrusco; fresh, fruity, dry, tannic, nice acid, beautiful fruity nose, frothy, nutty, grapy, jammy, fun, and refreshing.  All this and it’s inexpensive too, really what more could you want?  This is a great wine to try that I whole heartedly recommend with all of my love and passion.  “Mikey likes it”, remember Mikey on TV?  I do if I had a penny for every time I’ve heard this in my life I’d be a wealthy man driving the Ferrari and drinking my dry frizzante Lambrusco on my way to get my fresh sliced hunk of Parmigiano-Reggiano to have with my Lambrusco.

LambruscoThis particular Lambrusco is a fantastic example of just how special Lambrusco can be. The Cleto Chiarli E Figli is made from Grasparossa and Sorbara grapes resulting in an intense red Lambrusco with a delightful fruity bouquet.  This Lambrusco is produced in the heart of the best Sorbara Lambrusco region.

My recommendation for the perfect pairing; if you haven’t had the pleasure of Lambrusco and pizza get on the phone now and order the pizza.  This Italian Lambrusco and pizza, well you will think you have died and gone to heaven.  Enough said…

Visit www.WineGuyMike.com to learn more, please subscribe to my blog an newsletter while visiting my site so you get my weekly updates.
From my table to yours,

 

 

This Week on Wine Time™ WineGuyMike™ – How to understand Italian Wine Labels

Join me live for Wine Time™ with WineGuyMike™ on ABC Montana. Wine Time airs bi-monthly on Friday’s during the 5:30PM news cast.  The next feature airs on 09/27/2013.

Today we are going to talk about Italian Red wine and how to better understand what’s on the label.  For many wine lovers this is one of those areas of the world that can be a bit daunting to understand, and that’s where I come in.  It’s my job to help you better understand challenging wine topics so you can enjoy the wine that we talk about here on the show.

Okay, let’s get started. Italy has been producing wine for 3,000 years.  It is said that Italy is not a country, just a gigantic vineyard from North to South.  There are over 2 thousand labels of wine in Italy, that’s a lot of bottles to know about.  Did you know that since 2008 Italy reins as the largest producer of wine in the world?

We are not going to tackle all of Italy in one week.  When it comes to red Italian wine there are three main regions to concentrate on first, Tuscany, Piedmont, and the Veneto regions.

There are literally hundreds of indigenous grape varietals planted throughout Italy, many which we have not ever heard of in America.  The main grapes that a person needs to know about to get started with Italian wines from these three regions are; In Tuscany the Italians grow Sangiovese, in Piedmont they grow Nebbiolo, and in the Veneto region a grape known as Corvina is what is grown.

Many grape growers in Italy now are growing Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Merlot.  Many American viticulture areas of America likewise are growing Italian varietals of grapes too.  Just to name a couple; In the Napa Valley some grape farmers are growing Barbara grapes, in Walla Walla some farmers grow Sangiovese grapes.  Grape varietals know no boundaries; the worlds grape farmers now better understand ideal geography, weather, and soil composition that grape varietals thrive in.

Let’s take a look at how the Italian wine laws dictate what ends up in your Italian bottle of wine.  Just like there are three Red wine regions to pay attention to first begin to understand Italian wines there are three Italian wine law designations one should understand as well.

Grape growers are governed by Italian law or what is known as the DOC – Denominazione di Origine Controllata and DOCG – Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita.  You will see this printed on the label of Italian wines.  There are many Italian wines that do not adhere to wine specifications within particular regions and these wines will be designated on their label as IGT – Indicazione Geografica.

IGT Label

IGT Label

DOC designations on a win bottle are much like that of French AOC wine laws, you will also see this designation on bottles of French wines.  The biggest difference between the DOC and AOC is that the Italian DOC has aging requirements.

The DOC governs:

  • Geographical limits of each region
  • Grapes varieties allowed in wines
  • The percentage of each grape used (Classico must be 80% Sangiovese) If the varietal is specified it must contain 85% of varietal
  • The amount of grapes that can be grown and harvested per acre
  • The minimum percentage of alcohol in a wine
  • Minimum aging requirements.  How much time a wine is aged in barrels or bottles
  • These wine laws became effective in 1963 in Italy

The difference between the DOC and DOCG is that the G in DOCG indicates that a wine is stylistically guaranteed to meet the standards set forth in Italian wine laws for specific regions.

DOCG Label

DOCG Label

Currently there are 35 DOCG wines in Italy, 7 from the Tuscany region and 9 from the Piedmont region.  There are over 300 DOC wines from Italy and many more wines that are designated IGT which just means they do not adhere to the standards set forth for a given region in which they are grown.  There are many great examples of all of these wines and you typically pay for the guarantee.  There are great IGT wines that do not adhere to the wine laws in the region or area in which they are grown, you just have to know what you are buying. But hey, that’s why you keep me around — right?

 

Arrivederci for now wine friends, enjoy the great  valued wine selections at the Market on Front.  You will find these two terrific wine selections there, and many more.

The wines reviewed today all receive the WineGuyMike™ Seal of Approval™

From my table to yours,

"from my table to yours"

Wine Time™ with WineGuyMike™ on ABC Montana – Hedges Family Estate Wines

Join me live for Wine Time™ with WineGuyMike™ on ABC Montana. Wine Time airs bi-monthly on Friday’s during the 5:30PM news cast.  The next feature airs on 08/30/2013.

This week on Wine Time™ with WineGuyMike™ on ABC Montana I’m talking about Hedges Family Estate Wines from the Red Mountain AVA in the Columbia Valley of Washington State.

Visit www.WineGuyMike.comto learn more, please subscribe to my blog an newsletter while visiting my site so you get my weekly updates.

From my table to yours,

Wine Time™ with WineGuyMike™ on ABC Montana – Hand of God Wines

Join me live for Wine Time™ with WineGuyMike™ on ABC Montana. Wine Time airs bi-monthly on Friday’s during the 5:30PM news cast.  The next feature airs on 7/05/2013.

This week on Wine Time™ with WineGuyMike™ on ABC Montana I’m talking about two special wines from Argentina.

ABC Montana TV Feature with Hand of God Wines;

The term Hand of God Moment is so profound and endearing that every Argentinean is intimately familiar with it.  This term is not used lightly in fact it is a term that is sacred for this South American culture.In 1986 during the finals of the World Cup Soccer Tournament Argentina was competing against England and the game was tied at 1-1, that was until a teammate of Diego Maradona who was at that time as revered as David Beckham is today, kicked the soccer ball to Maradona who lunged with his head and couldn’t reach the ball except with his fist.
Maradona thrust his fist toward the ball guiding it past the goalie and into the goal and winning the game for Argentina.  This play known as “The Hand of God Moment” is forever ingrained in the minds of the Argentineans as the thrill of victory and for England the agony of defeat.

For two Stanford alums enjoying a glass of wine or two together it became their personal Hand of God moment.  Jon Staenberg, a.k.a “El Jefe”, and Santiago Achával, a.k.a “Master of Malbec” dubbed by The Wine Spectator magazine, this was their special moment, the moment when inspiration, friendship, and passion intersected as one.  This was there Hand of God moment, it was also the beginning of Hand of God Wines in the Mendoza appellation of Argentina.

These two Stanford alums met as they studied business at Stanford University.  After school both of these men went their own ways, Santiago as an entrepreneur who enjoyed success in the cement business in Argentina and Jon who is also an interesting entrepreneur in the field of technology, spending the bulk of his career with a little company called Microsoft.

It was on a trip to visit Argentina that Jon decided to look up Santiago and have a glass of wine together.  It was this Hand of God reunion that over a glass of wine or two that the passion and love for wine resulted in a winery in Argentina which produces the Hand of God Wines.

Staenberg is the owner and proprietor and Achával is the winemaker.  This is a partnership made in heaven hence the name Hand of God Wines.  When anything happens that is special and perhaps other worldly this is when the Argentineans look to the heavens and make reference to a Hand of God moment.

Thankfully for you and I, the wine drinker, this divine intervention came to be in the form of Hand of God Wines.  Vineyard land in Mendoza is 150 times less to purchase than land in the Napa Valley of California and it is also land that is in Achával’s soul.  This is where he is from, this is what he loves and calls home, and for WineGuyMike this is also a component of terroir, a true sense of place.

South American vineyard land can be very special, just look at Chile and Argentina, very different yet both produce very good wine in the hands of a skilled winemaker such as Santiago Achával.  Location is everything and after an exhaustive search Staenberg and Achával found two perfect vineyards in which they now produce world-class wines.  A third white wine that I know will be equally as impressive is on its way very soon.

 

 

Hand of God Wines is a boutique winery that produces hand crafted wines that of exceptional quality.  When Wine Spectator magazine referred to Achával as “The Master of Malbec” they were not exaggerating.  The wines he is making at Hand of God Wines are so important to the world because it is acknowledgement of quality of land and soil composition, elevation of land, climate, prevailing wind patterns, and pristine alpine water that bless this land.  This is what Achával brings to the world as a gift in the form of a bottle of wine that exemplifies terroir of two very special vineyards in Mendoza, Argentina.

Valle de Uco, Appellation Mendoza, Argentina

The Hand of God vineyards are located a little over sixty miles from one another.  The Stolen Horse Vineyard is an old vine Malbec property with vines nearing 100 years of age.  This vineyard produces fruit with a complexity and quality that that only aged vines are able.  The fruit in this vineyard is intense, concentrated, with , layers of flavor and aroma, that which only can be produced from old vine fruit.

The 2010 vintage of Old Vine Malbec from Stolen Horse Vineyard is extremely well made featuring structure, balance, and restraint which is difficult in a wine this powerful.  This wine can be enjoyed now if decanted for an hour giving it a twirl in the decanter a couple times during that time.

2010 Old Vine Malbec

This wine like a great Bordeaux or a Beckstoffer To Kalon wine from California will be best in 5 years but is so well made can be laid down for 15-25 years.  I hope I live that long because I do want to taste this very special wine then.

Stolen Horse Vineyard Maipú

This bottle of wine is perfectly balanced in fruit, acid and tannin.  The minerality and earthen quality is terrific but for me I love what the French refer to as anime, a meat like quality that makes this wine particularly special.  This wine is so good that honestly should only be paired with quality dry aged beef or Elk, it is just that good.

The second wine that Achával has crafted for the Hand of God Wines is a red blend wine that is so uncommon to Argentina that I dare call it a rarity.  The 2010 Fingerprint Series Red Wine is a French Style Rhone blend that is ready to go now.

2010 Fingerprint Series Red Wine

This wine is fluid and elegant, honestly better than most Rhone wine available in the United States.  This blend is 55% Malbec, 35% Syrah, and 10% Petit Verdot and is beautiful on the nose and the palate.  The finish leaves you in thought, wondering just what this vineyard looks like as it is still horse plowed and fruit that is hand harvested.  This is why both of these treasures from Achával are so individual and thought provoking.  This is not common wine, this is special and it is important to share wines that in a world of so much commonality amongst wines that there are some that are so distinct that they stand alone.  This is the wine that Santiago Achával makes and I thank him for that.

Sobremesa Vineyard

This wine is so synonymous when paired with Wild Game, Wild Fowl, Grilled Chicken, and just perfect with well-marbled meats.  Well-made sauces for any of these entrees would also complement perfectly.  This wine is concentrated with fruit yet is so delicate, delicious aroma, and layer upon layer of flavor is reveled with an understated dusting of fine white pepper.  A finish that begs for more.

Hand of God Wines are not only lovely they are provoking and I have been so fortunate to taste the nectar of God, this was my Hand of God moment.  Thank you Jon Staenberg and Santiago Achával for your passion and commitment to do something very special.

Visit www.WineGuyMike.com to learn more, please subscribe to my blog an newsletter while visiting my site so you get my weekly updates.
From my table to yours,

 

 

Wine Time™ with WineGuyMike™ on ABC Montana – Lambrusco Day

Join me live for Wine Time™ with WineGuyMike™ on ABC Montana. Wine Time airs bi-monthly on Friday’s during the 5:30PM news cast.  The next feature airs on 7/05/2013.

This week on Wine Time™ with WineGuyMike™ on ABC Montana I’m talking about Lambrusco. Why you might ask?  Because today, June 21st, is Lambrusco Day in Italy, and Lambrusco is one of the best wines to enjoy with food. Simple, fun, fizzy, refreshing, inexpensive, need I say more?
Lambrusco is one of Italy’s most popular wines. Do you remember one of television’s most famous of tag lines “Riunite on Ice, That’s Nice”? Yes that’s right your Grandma’s Lambrusco, Riunite, is still claiming to be the biggest selling Italian wine in history here in the United States.

Riunite Lambrusco was launched in the late 1960’s and what now seem like cheesy commercials ran on TV in the 70’s.  Cheesy or not that famous tag line is one of the most memorable ever, at least for those of us old enough to remember.  But the truth is this brand enjoyed one of the most well executed marketing campaigns ever.  That was yesterday, today Lambrusco has come of age and I’m here to share it with you.

There is not anything to complicated or technical that we need to know in our approach to buying, chilling, and drinking Lambrusco.  In fact Lambrusco is rather simple and ultimately the secret to a great Lambrusco is one that produces a great head of foam when you pour it, just like a great beer.  Selections will unfortunately be limited on your local shelves unless you live in an area that has a great wine shop.  If you live on the east coast you will have more choices better selections. Wherever you have a concentration of die-hard Italians like me that enjoy Lambrusco retailers will show this sparkling gem from Italy some love.

More and more you will find Lambrusco lovers who are so incredibly passionate about this frizzante wine from the Emilia-Romagna region in the heart of Italy that you just have to give it a try.

The Emilia-Romagna region is located between two of my favorite areas in Italy. Parma which is home to some of my favorite raw cow’s milk cheese Parmigiano-Reggiano, yet another wonder of the world I cannot live without.  On the other side of Emilia is probably one of the most iconic areas of Italy, Modena, and the birth place of Ferrari exotic sports cars.

Italian winemakers produce a large range of Lambrusco wines.  If you shop at a nice specialty shop and they take their wine program seriously it is somewhat safe to assume they have chosen a good selection of wines for you to purchase.  The best Lambrusco’s are going to be dry and made in a frizzante style.  There are three colors of fizzy Lambruscos: white (bianco), rose (rosato) and the classic red (rosso) ranging from sweet to bone dry.

Prosecco is another Italian favorite that is mainly produced as a sparkling wine in either the fully sparkling (spumante) or lightly sparkling (frizzante, gentile) styles.  Proseccos are labeled “brut”, “extra dry”, or “dry”, with the brut being the driest.  Ask you wine steward of the store you shop in for the driest Lambrusco in a frizzante style that they offer for sale.

Lambrusco is made using the Charmat method rather than the Champagne method, the French method of making sparkling wine.  The Charmat method is a second fermentation in pressurized tanks rather than in individual bottles.  The shorter, tank fermentation is preferable for Lambrusco because it preserves the freshness and the flavor of the grapes.

Unlike Champagne, Lambrusco does not ferment in the bottle consequently the wine goes off or gets old quickly and should be drunk as young as possible, preferably within one year.

What I love about Old World European wine is that they are a function of necessity.  The wines in each area are made to work with, match, or pair with the foods that are grown and raised in the region or area.  Lambrusco is no different and in the Emilia-Romagna region their food tends to be rich, salty and that is why Lambrusco works so well with the indigenousness foods of the area.

Lambrusco wine is lively and bright with fruit, balanced out with naturally high acidity which pair perfectly with the rich salty food dishes from this area.  Lambrusco like all Old World style wines are not overdone, featuring lower percentage of alcohol which is also conducive to being a great wine to pair with food.

The really terrific thing to note about Lambrusco is that you will be hard pressed to ever find one more expensive than $20.00 and many are $8.00-$10.00.  Wow that works in this economy for my pocket-book.

Many bottles will list the Lambrusco grape variety from which it has been produced.  I’m not going to bore you with the 13-17 different Lambrusco grape varietals because there are only a handful you need to know.  Here is the short list; The most commonly found clones are the Grasparossa, Maestri, Marani, Monstericco, Salamino and Sorbara.  The rabid Lambrusco lovers, they love the Sobara version but any of these are ones that you want.  If you want to dig in a little deeper here is a link from my friends in Italy and their site which is solely devoted to Lambrusco; http://www.lambruscoday.org/facts-or-fiction.html

Here’s what you should expect from a good Lambrusco; fresh, fruity, dry, tannic, nice acid, beautiful fruity nose, frothy, nutty, grapy, jammy, fun, and refreshing.  All this and it’s inexpensive too, really what more could you want?  This is a great wine to try that I whole heartedly recommend with all of my love and passion.  “Mikey likes it”, remember Mikey on TV?  I do if I had a penny for every time I’ve heard this in my life I’d be a wealthy man driving the Ferrari and drinking my dry frizzante Lambrusco on my way to get my fresh sliced hunk of Parmigiano-Reggiano to have with my Lambrusco.

Drei Dona Reggiano Lambrusco

This Lambrusco was fantastic with my dinner, and again it was so nice that the alcohol level was restrained. The Rosenere immediately shows beautifully in the glass, deep purple color and sporting a perfect frothy head. Remember this is what a good Lambrusco should have and even as this wine sits in between sips and you give it a swirl the nice frothy head returns immediately.

The nose on this beauty is equally as pleasing with notes of grape, raspberry, strawberry, and a little cherry. On the palate this wine is so tasty with nicely balanced fruit, acid, and tannin. The Rosenere Lambrusco is like an extra-dry Prosecco which means it is semi-dry and is slightly sweet. The sweetness is appropriate and not annoying in any way.  It just feels right in your mouth, and it is.  The finish leaves you with a delightful lingering memory of refreshing fruit.

This is a very nice Lambrusco that I can recommend for you and the nice part is that it retails for $8.00 at one of my favorite wine retailers.

Visit www.WineGuyMike.com to learn more, please subscribe to my blog an newsletter while visiting my site so you get my weekly updates.
From my table to yours,