Tag Archives: Mendoza

Paul Hobbs Endless Summer of Wine on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©

Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MDT.

Each week WineGuyMike™ will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 – $25.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

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Today’s Podcast; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/10/16/wine-guy-mike-for-october-16/

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Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at www.CiaoMambo.com

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world.

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

Welcome to the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© this Sunday morning.  Paul Hobbs has been referred to as pioneer, trendsetter, trailblazer, and a prospector.  Originally from Upstate New York Paul grew up in a farming environment.  His first exposure to wine was a 1962 Château d’Yquem that his father brought home and poured into paper cups at the family dinner table.  This memorable wine filled the room with an unforgettable aroma and a never ending impression on Paul’s mind and palate.  His love and passion for wine began and in 1969 Paul convinced his father to replace trees in their apple orchard with grape vines.

Paul studied at Notre Dame with the intent of becoming a doctor.  His botany professor had been a former winemaker at Christian Brothers Winery in California and held weekly wine tasting seminars.  The rest was history, Paul’s focus shifted to winemaking.  His master’s program took Paul to UC Davis were he enrolled in the Master of Food Science program in the Department of Enology.

Paul’s thesis on Oak Extraction landed him a research job with Robert Mondavi Winery.  It was at the Mondavi Winery that his hands on wine production experience gained him a promotion as Enologist.  In 1981 Paul was named Head Enologist of Opus One.

In 1985 Paul moved to Simi Winery as Assistant Winemaker and it was here that his interest in other wine-regions around the world grew.  Chile and Argentina were two of the emerging new wine-regions that really intrigued him.  Paul’s recognition as a winemaker landed him consulting rolls with many other premium wineries in California.

In 1991 Paul decided to strike out on his own and founded Paul Hobbs Winery.  His mission was to produce small lot, hand-crafted, vineyard designate wines.  He started with three wines—one chardonnay, one pinot noir and one cabernet sauvignon.  He strove to produce wines that represented a sense of place and today he produces a dozen wines from new and historic vineyards.

Paul purchased 19 acres of land in 1998 located in the Russian River Valley.  He produces wine there that is recognized throughout the world as some of the very finest.  Paul Hobbs is one of the top winemakers in the world now and as a trailblazer he lives an Endless Summer of wine.  During our North American winter Paul travels to Argentina in the Mendoza wine-region to make wine at his property that he is a partner in, Viña Cobos Felino. 

Viña Cobos owners  Andrea Marchiori, Luis Barraud, and Paul Hobbs all whose winemaking backgrounds are steeped in Old World European winemaking tradition.  This team’s goal for Viña Cobos was to produce an unparalleled Malbec that exuded power and elegance.  In 1999 Viña Cobos released their first vintage of Malbec which received the highest score for any Argentinean wine.

The portfolio of wine has grown with continued accolades for the Viña Cobos partners.  This family of wine now includes three tiers which include Cobos, Bramare and Felino.  All three of these labels offer exceptional chardonnay, merlot, malbec and cabernet sauvignon.

Paul Hobbs has always been committed to crafting unfiltered and unfined wines and utilizing native yeasts in the fermenting process.  His commitment to winemaking technique results in exceptional wines that are well structured. Paul’s wines are a product of classic old world technique.

The Felino wines express great balance of pure, concentrated fruit that is lively with acidity and smooth, fine, tannins.  The Viña Cobos Felino label offers Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec and Chardonnay that is vibrant, lush, mouth-filling wine with beautiful texture that pairs exceptionally well with food.  Did I mention these wines sell for under $16.00.  These wines offer incredible value as many of Paul’s California wine offerings are far north of $100.00.

I recently tasted through a horizontal lineup, or wines from same vintage of 2009 Viña Cobos Felino starting with the chardonnay.  Visually this wine has beautiful straw color and the wine is not fined which allows sediment to be suspended in the glass.  This is not to say that the wine does not present elegant.  This chardonnay is produced utilizing the native yeast which forms on the grapes in the vineyard.  This allows the wine to truly deliver a real sense of the vineyard in which the grapes are grown.  On the nose this wine presents nice vegetal, herbaceous, caramel and earthy aromas.  My palate came alive with green apple, white pepper, straw, acid, citrus, and yeast.  Just delightful.  The finish is what I loved though as I found it to be one of the most unusual finishes I’ve experienced in a wine.  The finished lingered like that of a nice single malt Scotch, clean with a little heat from the white pepper.  A very nice wine indeed.

The 2009 Viña Cobos Felino Cabernet Sauvignon is 88% cabernet sauvignon, 8 % syrah, 4% petit verdot.  The grapes get a 3 to 4 day cold soak; 15 to 18 days total maceration and are fermented with selected and native yeasts.  This wine receives second native malolactic fermentation in barrel for 5 months and is then aged 9 months in American and French oak barrels, 20% of these are new oak.

This is a big, 14.5% alcohol,  yet very refined in a way that it has not been over manipulated.  A deep ruby hue paves the way for a nose that is ripe with aromas of saddle leather, subtle sweet tobacco, minerality, and earthiness. The palate is lush with a rich well rounded mouth-feel that is complex.  There is a great balance of dark fruit, black currant and boysenberry, mineral, sweet tobacco, and acid. This wine is both rich yet remains lively and well structured with perfect tannin.

2009 Felino Viña Cobos Malbec. This 100% malbec undergoes a 3 to 4 day cold soak with a 15 to 18 days total maceration.  There is secondary native malolactic fermentation in the barrel taking 4 months to complete.  Visually this 2009 Malbec presents a beautiful crimson color in the glass.  The nose of this South American beauty is ripe with red raspberry, anise, with a slight nuance of cocoa, a wonderful aroma.  The palate delivers a rich spicy mouth-feel that reveals fruit, a hint of caramel and mineral.  This malbec has a nice round balance with sturdy structure.  This wine is supple, smooth with refined tannin that makes this a great wine to drink and pair with food.  A long finish from this wine that you don’t want to end.

The wines reviewed today all receive the WineGuyMike™ Seal of Approval™

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"

"A Tale of Terroir" this week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©

Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MDT.

Each week WineGuyMike™ will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 – $25.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/09/25/wine-guy-mike-for-september-25th/

 My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhee

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors      

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at www.CiaoMambo.com

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world. 

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

This week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show; “The Tale of Two Terroir’s.”  There are two countries from South America that produce exceptional wine of value.  Chile and Argentina are known by wine lovers from around the world to produce great wine that’s affordable.  These two countries run parallel to one another yet produce very different styles of wine, but make no mistake there are great wines being produced in Chile and Argentina and I have two that I enjoy and will share with you.

In the world of wine you will see the word terroir used when writers are describing wine, vineyards, or perhaps well-known wine regions in general.  Simply stated terroir defines a sense of place.  When a winemaker talks about their wine and refers to terroir they are suggesting that the wine expresses the personality of the earth, the weather that influences grapes in a vineyard, subtle yet unique nuances imparted as a result of terroir.  These subtleties may exist  only in one small block of land. 

Napa Valley’s most famous vineyard To Kalon is a perfect example.  To Kalon is Ancient Greek for “the highest beauty”, this vineyard  provides Robert Mondavi Winery with most of the grapes for its world-class Cabernet Sauvignon Reserve,  and is the exclusive source of Sauvignon Blanc.  You begin to realize just how romantic and powerful this term “terroir” becomes as your personal relationship with wine evolves.   

The Colchagua Valley of Chile is on the west coast of South America and enjoys a Mediterranean climate that is somewhat unique when it comes to wine country terroir.  Chile is a melting pot of European influence that runs north to south on the West Coast of South America and is 2,600 miles in length, but it is only 100 miles wide at its widest point.  There is a heavy influence of German, Spanish, English, and French that have taken up residence and enjoy this wonderful Mediterranean climate.

The Colchagua Valley wine region has four clearly defined seasons which is rare and exists at only four other points around the world: the Mediterranean coast; the California coast; the Cape of Good Hope; and the southeast coast of Australia. The climate in Chile falls somewhere in between that of California and Bordeaux.  Rich aroma and flavor in the wines of this valley are the result of Pacific maritime influence and breezes from the Andes Mountain slopes that move through the vineyards.

Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah, and Carmenère are the most widely planted red grape varietals in the Colchagua Valley.  In 1996 Chile exported 100,000 cases of wine to the United States and today that number has increased to 7 million cases. The quality and value of wines from Chile speaks for itself which is duly noted by the increased exports.

Chilean wines adhere to the European Union label requirements.  The wine must contain 85% of the grape variety, vintage, and domaine of origin (D.O.) that are indicated on the label.

Argentina is the largest wine-producing country of South American and the fifth largest producing country in the world.  With 300 days of sunshine and an average of only 8 inches of rain each year the Argentinians have established an elaborate irrigation system fed by runoff from the snow-capped Andes Mountains.

The Jesuit missionaries began making wine in the mid-fifteen century in the Mendoza region of Argentina.  The Uco Valley (pronounced ooko) of Mendoza produces mainly Malbec, Tempranillo, and Cabernet Sauvignon.  Argentina is widely recognized throughout the world for their outstanding Malbec wines that offer a real bargain for the wine consumer.  The Mendoza region has over 70% of the total 500,000 vineyard acres planted in all of Argentina.  There are over 600 vineyards located in Mendoza. 

The grapes in this Mendoza region are planted at high altitude near the base of the Andes Mountains.  With hot days, cool nights, and breezes from the mountains producing beautiful fruit that is concentrated and naturally acidic.  The result is excellent wine that is balanced and well structured.

When you read the label on the bottle of Argentinean Wine the grape that is listed is 100% of that varietal.  The Malbec wines from this region offer tremendous single varietal focus and in the hands of a great winemaker will leave you with a memorable finish on your palate and in your mind.

In tasting both the 2009 Quatro blend and 2009 Killka Malbec wines you will discern a very distinct style of winemaking.   The difference in these two wines is very representative of Chilean and Argentinean wines.  Chilean wines have a tendency toward big, rich, full-bodied wines whereas Argentinean wines typically are concentrated, focused, and a bit less refined. 

Here are two outstanding examples of South American wines of exceptional value.  The first is a Chilean red blend from Viña MontGras; the 2009 MontGras Quatro is a blend of 50% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Malbec; 15% Carmenère, and 15% Syrah.  This wine is a deep ruby color in the glass and on the nose offers aromas of fresh-roasted coffee, dark fruit of black currants and cherries, leather with a hint of vanilla.  When you smell this you know you want to taste it, and you won’t be disappointed.

This wine on the palate is full-bodied, rich, soft, supple, and round.  There is a very nice balance of fruit and acid which allows it to pair well with food.  This wine is not so big and over extracted that it will over power you or your food pairing.  The Quatro serves up a long, luscious, and lingering finish.  This wine is under $15.00.  Pair this wine with grilled Top Sirloin or Prime Rib.

The Argentinean wine from Mendoza that offers tremendous value is 2009 Salentine “Killka” Malbec.  This wine is flamboyant, fruit forward, spicy and perfectly tannic.  In your glass the wine has a deep purple hue with darker  streaks of purple when held up to the light.  Dark plum and blackberry with a bit of sweet vanilla meet the nose.  This wine has great fruit, balance, and structure on the palate.  Don’t forget about the wonderful silky tannins this wine offers.  The Killka has not been overly manipulated in the winemaking process and this is one of its best qualities.  Available for under $15.00.  Pair this wine with Rib Eye or Filet Mignon and a red wine reduction or green peppercorn sauce.

Both wines receive the WineGuyMike™ seal of approval®

Cin Cin

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"

Grillin’ and Chillin’ on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© Perfect Wine and Beef for Your Barbeque.

Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MDT.

Each week WineGuyMike™ will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 – $25.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/07/10/wine-guy-mike-for-71011/

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors      

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at www.CiaoMambo.com

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world. 

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

This week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© we’re Grillin’ and Chillin’.  The dog days of summer are upon us and I wanted to share with you my thoughts on pairing wines with beef.  Its summer and I’m thinkin’ about grillin’ and chillin’.  When we think about food and wine paired together it is worth putting a little bit of thought into it.  Why?  When you match or pair the right food with the right wine it’s like magic, the wine and food not only complement one another they bring out the best in each other.  So what do you need to know?  Matching wine and food is just a balancing act and here are a few things to think about.  Is the food texture heavy or light, how I will be cooking my meal, and are there any sauces involved?  As for the wine piece of this equation what type of wine do your guests and you enjoy.   

Okay so it’s a beautiful summer day I’ve got some friends and family coming over and I’m in the mood to grill and chill.   Now I am thinking about what type of beef I’m going to select, how I’m going to prepare it, and finally how I’m going to serve it.  The next thing I’m going to consider is the texture of the particular cut of beef that I’m going to serve my guests for dinner.  What makes this thought process fun is when you set down to share your meal with your friends and family and you can let them know about the wine your serving with the meal and why it makes them feel like the special guests that they are.

Now let’s talk a little about steak sauce.  Most folks like to garnish with a steak sauce and this is something to consider as well.  Steak sauce if you will notice on the list of ingredients has a great deal of some form of vinegar included in it, this is a form of acid.  One of the reasons these sauces include vinegar or acid is the fact that acid brings out flavors in food and helps to leave a lingering flavor on your palette.  If I were to recommend a wine with a crème or cheese sauce I would be suggesting a wine with a high acid content that would be medium to full bodied.  A red tomato based sauce such as a marinara would call for a light body red wine, but for this dinner we are grilling steaks.

Just as foods have a texture and firmness wines also have a quality of texture.  Remember we are looking for balance and a synergy between wine and the foods they are paired with.  A full bodied wine bold on texture should not be paired with delicate dishes nor should they be paired with a food dish that is big on flavor.  Big wine and big flavor just don’t work well together, we are looking for harmony.  A mild food dish would do well to be paired with a medium to light body wine.

I’m going to choose some cuts of beef that are my personal favorites.  I love prime grade Top Sirloin; prime grade beef is richer and has a much suppler mouthfeel than the standard grade of beef.  Just as wine has a texture and mouthfeel so does your beef if you think about it. Rib Eyes are another great cut of beef I love, oh that’s right I love all beef.  Beef and wine matched correctly is just a beautiful thing. 

As I share this love affair of wine and beef with you I would like you to note that I really consider the percentage of marbling in particular cuts of beef as I’m choosing the right wines to partner with my guests meal.  

The Chuck Section: Hamburger has a higher fat content and will make a tasty, juicy burger that is well suited for a nice fruit-forward Cabernet Sauvignon.  A Cabernet varietal is a big, powerful red wine that is full in body, rich, and very flavorful.  Cabernet Sauvignon is a wine that imparts flavors of fruits, berries, currants, and plums.  This wine may also exhibit slight spicy nuances.

2009 Layer Cake Cabernet

Layer Cake Cabernet Sauvignon from California

Layer Cake Cabernet Sauvignon from California

The 2009 Layer Cake Cabernet displays a beautiful deep garnet color.  Aromas of blackberry, cassis, violets, cedar, tobacco, and hints of minerals and graphite.  Sweet, densely packed and creamy in the mouth, but with firm, underlying structure that gives lift to the dark berry, chocolate, and coffee flavors.  This is a very lush, soft, complex wine that coats the palate and spreads out on the long, lingering finish.

The Rib Section: A Rib Eye steak that is well marbled is a rich and flavorful will pair well with a bold, spicy Syrah.  Syrah is a big powerful full bodied wine, also known as Shiraz in Australia.  Supple, smooth, rich with well mannered mellow tannins describes the Syrah wines.  Flavor wise a Syrah can be slightly spicy, fruity like black cherries, or some may have a deep nutty flavoring.

2009 Layer Cake Shiraz

Layer Cake Shiraz from the Barossa Valley in South Australia

Layer Cake Shiraz from the Barossa Valley in South Australia

Dark, dense and creamy, complex aromas of black plum, Bing cherry, blackberry and pepper merge with licorice, tobacco, mocha and dark chocolate. This is one inky Shiraz; an explosion of dark, super ripe, wild blackberry, with a touch of cigar box finishing with a mélange of exotic spices. A pure fruit bomb…complete from attack through a long, lingering finish.
The Short Loin Section: Filet Mignon is a lean, delicate cut that is well suited to a nice smooth wine with great body.  The wine Pinot Noir is the grape variety of red burgundian wines; it can produce wines that are incredible.  When aged in oak, it should have a sweetness reminiscent of raspberries, with undertones of vegetation and chocolate.  The wine can stand up to aging for many years.  Pinot Noir at its best will be smooth, full of flavor, and have a beautiful bouquet.

Adelsheim 2009 Willamette Valley Pinot Noir

Adelsheim 2009 Willamette Valley Pinot Noir

Adelsheim 2009 Willamette Valley Pinot Noir

“With its broad array of origins and clones, this wine displays red aromas (candied cherry, pomegranate and raspberry), on the nose and the palate. In addition, one finds a light touch of brown spices (nutmeg, cinnamon, and allspice). True to the Adelsheim house style, this Pinot Noir is elegantly textured with seamlessly integrated, silky, polished tannins.  This is perfect match with any Filet Mignon that you serve.

The Sirloin Section: Boneless Sirloin is a less tender but tends to be more flavorful than other cuts of meat from the loin section.  Malbec is one of Argentina’s finest!  A good Malbec will present itself as fruit forward, medium bodied and flamboyant, I love this red.  Spicy and tannic at its best this wine can be outstanding.

Maipe Malbec

Maipe Malbec

Maipe Malbec – Smooth enough it really doesn’t even need food, and has a 90 point rating. The Mendoza region of Argentina produces amazing Malbec.  In this warm dry climate the Malbec achieves near perfect ripeness and have a silky texture with intense flavors of blackberry, peppery spice, and balsamic herbs. The cooler, well-drained slopes of the hillsides of the region are perfect terrior for the Malbec grape.

The Round Section: An Eye of Round served pepper-crusted and rare is a very lean, slightly chewy cut.  This will pair well with a Red Blend that has great structure. 

Bookwalter Subplot No 25

Bookwalter Subplot No 25

Subplot No 25 –  A great red blend from the Columbia valley comprised of 30% Cabernet 27% Merlot 14% Syrah 9% Petit Verdot 4% Barbera 3% Cab Franc.  Aromatics of currants, dark berries, black plums, mocha and marzipan linger as the wine enters the palate full of ripe fruit flavors, Black Forest cherries, Boysenberries, and dates layered with cola, resin, graphite and a dash of Thai spice. You will experience a lush and full mid palate prelude that leads to a velour like finish.  This wine is great balance of fruit and acidity.

Each lot of wine selected for Subplot is carefully chosen each year after they have made their final blends for their top tier wines.  Bookwalter creates a flavorful, full-bodied yet approachable wine by layering vintages, vineyards and varietals in their Subplot wines.  Press wine from our oldest vineyards are aged longer in the cellar to help soften the tannins and create more mature flavors and wine from their  younger vines and more recent vintages are added to the blend to bring the lush and bright fruit characteristics forward in the wine. 

The Brisket Section: Brisket that is slowly cooked on the barbeque can be buttery, smoky, with flavors that call for the red fruit and fig aromas and full bodied profile of Sangiovese A.K.A. Chianti, but in this case we are going to take it up a notch and go right to the heart of Tuscany and into the Chianti Classico region.  This spicy medium bodied red will exhibit nuances of cherry and raspberry flavor with just the right amount of tannin, acid, and fruit.  A nice Chianti Classico will pair so well with the buttery and smoky flavor of the Brisket.

Castello di Fonterutoli 2006

Castello di Fonterutoli 2006

Castello di Fonterutoli 2006

This wine is a stunning composition of strikingly diverse Sangiovese’s notes, some of which are exclusively found on the Mazzei Estate, and have rarely been tasted before.

This incredible wine has a deep and impenetrable ruby red color.   The wine is incredibly layered, it opens up with subtle hints of fresh spices (black pepper) that develop into perfumes of fresh red fruits (red currant), and followed by more intense dark ripe fruits (plum).  The harmony of flavors is concluded by notes of forest undergrowth and an earthy, musky finale.  This is an unbelievable wine.

The Flank Section: Thin Flank Steak is best slowly grilled over a low flame.  The smoky flavors from the grill and intense beef flavor compliment a Zinfandel.  This full bodied, fruit forward, and spicy wine is one of California’s favorites, and most plentiful.  Berries, cherries, tobacco, oak, and vanilla this wine seems to have it all.

2009 Plungerhead "Lodi" Zinfandel

2009 Plungerhead "Lodi" Zinfandel

2009 Plungerhead “Lodi” Zinfandel – This wine is dark ruby in color with flecks of orange.  The old vine Zinfandel vineyards ripened evenly in the Lodi heat of 2009. This allowed the old vine character to explode in this blend with aromas of jammy raspberry, hints of orange rind, clove, and rich caramel oak. In the mouth, this Zinfandel has flavors of dried strawberry, dark raspberry, plum sauce, cedar, and pomegranate, with hints of white pepper and cherry liquor. The finish is sweet fruit, toasty oak, and lingering warm spices.

Alright head to the store and purchase you beef selection you’ve decided on, stoke up the grill, and open up your wine so it can breathe and be at its best to serve to your guests.  They’ll think they are kings and queens, remember keep the wine in the house in a cool place so they are served at the right temperature. 

WineGuyMike™ raises his glass in a toast to you grillin’ and chillin’ this weekend.  Grill on wine warriors!

"from my grill to yours"

"from my grill to yours"

WineGuyMike Radio Show with Scott and Paula on The Ranch 08/04/10

Check out the radio show on The Ranch 107.1FM or 97.9FM in The Bitterroot Valley.  How about a live stream feed at www.107theranch.com.

The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© with Scott and Paula on The Ranch airs weekly on Wednesday mornings at 8:20AM MDT, come and join in on the fun you never know what we are going to talk about.  Each week we will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

The show is sponsored by Grizzly Liquor, “Missoula’s Best Choice”.  Follow Grizzly Liquor on their Facebook fan page – Grizzly Liquor Missoula

WineguyMike™ Radio Show© with Scott and Paula on The Ranch has a new additional sponsor we would like to welcome today.  The Lolo Creek Steak House, “rare yet well done”, located in Lolo, MT.  Find them online at www.lolocreeksteakhouse.com

Today’s WineGuyMike™ recommendations at Grizzly Liquor:

Bookwalter blend, "Subplot No 23"

Bookwalter blend, “Subplot No 23″

Subplot No 23 – 30% Cabernet 27% Merlot 14% Syrah 9% Petit Verdot 4% Barbera 3% Cab Franc.  Aromatics of currants, dark berries, black plums.  Mocha & marzipan linger as the wine enters the palate full of ripe fruit flavors, Black Forest cherries, Boysenberries, and dates layered with cola, resin, graphite and a dash of Thai spice.  A lush and full mid palate prelude a velour like finish, balanced with a touch of acidity.

Each lot of wine selected for Subplot is carefully chosen each year after they have made their final blends for their top tier wines.  Bookwalter attempts to create a flavorful, full-bodied yet approachable wine by layering vintages, vineyards and varietals in our Subplot wines.  Press wine from our oldest vineyards are aged longer in the cellar to help soften the tannins and create more mature flavors and wine from our younger vines and more recent vintages are added to the blend to bring the lush, young fruit characteristics forward in the wine.  The result is a wine that offers, fruit, structure, approachability and exceptional value.  Although these wines are meant to be consumed in their youth, the wines have showed graceful aging potential.

Maipe Malbec

Maipe Malbec

 Maipe Malbec – Smooth enough it really doesn’t even need food, and has a 90 point rating. The Mendoza region of Argentina produces amazing Malbec.  In this warm dry climate the Malbec achieves near perfect ripeness and have a silky texture with intense flavors of blackberry, peppery spice, and balsamic herbs. The cooler, well-drained slopes of the hillsides of the region are perfect terrior for the Malbec grape.

Plungerhead 2008 "Lodi" Zinfandel

Plungerhead 2008 “Lodi” Zinfandel

 Plungerhead “Lodi” Zinfandel – Dark purple in color, the 2008 Lodi Zinfandel blend boasts brambly aromas of dried blueberry, black currants and molasses with hints of cardamom and nutmeg spice.  This Zinfandel blend then erupts in your mouth with raspberry liquor, Dutch cocoa powder, blackberry cobbler, cinnamon, and cedar with hints of rosemary and roasted Poblano chilies.  The wine lingers on your palate with the combination of fruit, spice, and oak adding to its full bodied nature and mouth filling tannins.  On the finish, flavors develop into mocha latte, toasted marshmallow, sweetened cranberry, white pepper, read more…and roasted French oak.

 This week’s winners are: Ric Thomas and Janel McCormick

As we are entering into the dog days of summer I thought it might be an appropriate time to look at pairing beef and wine.  When one considers wine and food I like to think of balance.  Balancing wine and food is a good place to start when determining what wine works with what food.  Here are a few other things to think about when choosing a wine too:

  • What wine do you like?
  • Food Texture, Heavy or Light?
  • How is the food prepared, Grilled, Baked, Sauteed?
  • What about a Sauce, Crème, Tomato.

Since it is summer most of my focus is going to be on beef that is grilled.  As I mentioned earlier I’m going to consider balance and in this case I’m referring to weightiness and texture of the cut of beef and the weight and texture of the wine I would like to choose to serve with dinner.  How am I going to cook the beef, today we are going to be grilling.  I’m also not going to be using a sauce, but will most of my guests be using a steak sauce to garnish their entrée with?  Okay now this brings up a great point, steak sauce.  Steak sauce if you will notice on the list of ingredients has a great deal of some form of vinegar included in it and this is called acid.  One of the reasons these sauces include vinegar or acid is the fact that acid brings out flavors in food and helps to leave a lingering flavor on your palette.  If I were to recommend a wine with a crème or cheese sauce I would be suggesting a wine with a high acid content and would be medium to full bodied.  A red tomato based sauce such as a marinara would call for a light body red wine, but for this dinner we are grilling steaks.

Just as foods have a texture and firmness wines also have a quality of texture.  Remember we are looking for balance and a synergy between wine and the foods they are paired with.  A full bodied wine bold on texture should not be paired delicate dishes nor should they be paired with a food dish that is big on flavor.  Big wine and big flavor just don’t work well together, we are looking for harmony.  A mild food dish would do well to be paired with a medium to light body wine.

I’m going to choose some cuts of beef that I’m personally interested in grilling.  I love prime Top Sirloin; this is a bit more marbled than a non-prime grade of beef.  Rib Eyes are another great cut of beef I love, oh that’s right I love most cuts of beef.

Cuts of Beef

Cuts of Beef

The Chuck Section: Hamburger has a higher fat content and will make a tasty, juicy burger that is well suited for a nice fruit-forward Cabernet Sauvignon.  A Cabernet varietal is a big, powerful red wine that is full in body, rich, and very flavorful.  Cabernet Sauvignon is a wine that imparts flavors of fruits, berries, currants, and plums.  This wine may also exhibit slight spicy nuances.

The Rib Section: A Rib Eye steak that is well marbled is a rich and flavorful will pair well with a bold, spicy Syrah.  Syrah is a big powerful full bodied wine, also known as Shiraz in Australia.  Supple, smooth, rich with well mannered mellow tannins describes the Syrah wines.  Flavor wise a Syrah can be slightly spicy, fruity like black cherries, or some may have a deep nutty flavoring
The Short Loin Section: Filet Mignon is a lean, delicate cut that is well suited to a nice smooth wine with great body.  The wine Pinot Noir is the grape variety of red burgundian wines; it can produce wines that are incredible.  When aged in oak, it should have a sweetness reminiscent of raspberries, with undertones of vegetation and chocolate.  The wine can stand up to aging for many years.  Pinot Noir at its best will be smooth, full of flavor, and have a beautiful bouquet.
The Sirloin Section: Boneless Sirloin is a less tender but tends to be more flavorful than other cuts of meat from the loin section.  Malbec is one of Argentina’s finest!  A fruit forward, medium bodied and flamboyant red.  Spicy and tannic at its best this wine can be outstanding, especially with a nice Malbec.

The Round Section: An Eye of Round served pepper-crusted and rare is a very lean, slightly chewy cut.  This will pair well with a Red Blend that has great structure.  Subplot No 23 a blend of Cabernet 27%, Merlot 14%, Syrah 9%, Petit Verdot, 4% Barbera, 3% Cab Franc. The concentration of black berries and toasty aromas is crowned with a long, velvety mid-taste.

The Brisket Section: Brisket that is slowly cooked on the barbeque can be buttery, smoky, with flavors that call for the red fruit and fig aromas and full bodied profile of the Bonarda.  This is wine with a long finish; soft, ripe tannins, and good balance of acidity.  Wines made with the Bonarda grape are immediately drinkable and known for the light body and fruitiness. Originally from the Piedmont Italy region Bonarda is also being grown in Brazil and Argentina, in fact there is six times more Bonarda being grown in South America than in Italy.  The soft tannins of a Bonarda will pair well with the buttery and smoky flavor of the Brisket.

The Flank Section: Thin Flank Steak is best slowly grilled over a low flame.  The smoky flavors from the grill and intense beef flavor compliment a Zinfandel.   This full bodied, fruit forward, and spicy wine is one of California’s favorites, and most plentiful.  Berries, cherries, tobacco, oak, and vanilla this wine seems to have it all.

A great link from FirenzeMom outlining cuts of meats in Italy; http://firenzemom.wordpress.com/2012/09/28/substitutes-in-italy-meat-cuts/

WineGuyMike’s Wine Lingo

This week’s new wine term is; Balance – this term is one that would refer to a harmony of fruit, tannin, acid, and alcohol.  There may be a nuance of fruit in a wine but it would not be so overwhelming that it would be out of balance or harmony when considering the other characteristics of a wine.

Astringent – This refers to a drying sensation in the mouth that may make you pucker.  It is common in young full bodied red wines such as a Cabernet or a Zinfandel.  This is caused by high tannin content in the wine.  Tannin is a tactile sensation, not a taste.

Crisp – Fresh, Bright, Young, and Slightly Acidic.  Wine Types are Sauvignon Blanc, Vermentino, and Chablis

Grassy – Refers to Herbal Characteristics often associated with Sauvignon Blanc

Oaky – A reference to a nuance in a wine resulting from wooden oak barrels that wines are aged in.  This term is common to Chardonnay’s and Cabernet wines.

Velvety – This term characterizes a wines texture.  This term would be used with a wine that has a rich and supple mouth feel.

Match the words that you think make sense; these words are descriptors for wine:

Bright = Flinty an epiphany in your mouth

Rich = Subtle mellow, smooth, decadent, just easy and fulfilling

Lively = Crisp the wine is refreshing, a zing, literally comes to life in your mouth

Intense = Juicy big, bold, forward just tastes like fruit you could bite into

Velvety = Aromatic sexy, goes down like silk, fills the room with its aroma

From My Table to Yours,

WineGuyMike

WineGuyMike

WineGuyMike