Tag Archives: Chardonnay

This WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© “The Long and Winding Road” to Waitiri Creek Winery

Join me live for Wine Time™ with WineGuyMike™ on ABC Montana. Wine Time airs bi-monthly on Friday’s during the 5:30PM news cast.  The next feature airs on 7/19/2013.

This week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© perhaps Paul McCartney said it best on the Beatles Let It Be album; “The long and winding road, That leads to your door, Will never disappear, I’ve seen that road before, It always leads me here, Lead me to your door”.

Paula Ramage and her husband Allistar Ward have traveled extensively and lived abroad in different places throughout the world but home for them is the Central Otago wine region on the South Island of New Zealand.  This is the southernmost grape growing region in the world, but they produce very good wine.  Paula grew up in Alexandra and the Ward family farmed for many years on Malaghan’s Road, near Arrowtown.  Last week’s blog provided an overview of New Zealand as a wine country; http://wp.me/pFhHw-Ao  This is a land that is breathtakingly beautiful and produces some of the finest single varietal wines available.

Paula Ramage has had at least 5 careers that she can recall but in spending time with her on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© this week I’ll forevermore think of her as Ambassador of New Zealand and the New Zealand wine industry.  Needless to say she is a terrific spokesperson and extremely knowledgeable about her country and the wine industry in New Zealand and throughout the world.  Paula handles all of Waitiri Creek’s administrative business and development of offshore markets, a natural for a “reformed barrister”.  She has a lovely Kiwi accent that you cannot help loving too.

Allistar Ward is a merchant banking consultant full time, although he makes time to focus on vineyard development and as Paula puts it, “he juggles all the balls and keep them in the air”.

Viticulture Crew, Mark and Jason

Viticulture Crew, Mark and Jason

Jason Thomson is their very accomplished viticulturist along with his team Mark Naismith and Scott Culpan who run the day to day operations.  Interestingly the Waitiri Creek winemaker is a woman, Jen, from the Willamette Valley of Oregon.  As I mentioned last week many winemakers are now traveling winemakers who work in the Northern Hemisphere during its summer months and the Southern Hemisphere during their summer.  With the Willamette and Central Otago sharing similar latitudes with a focus on cool weather grape varietals it is a natural for winemakers like Jen.

Shanagolden Block in Summer

Shanagolden Block in Summer

In 1993 Paula and Allistar purchased their first vineyard the Shanagolden Block in Gibbston and planted Chardonnay in 1994.   The northerly facing block was ideal for sustainable viticulture and the lower half of this area provided a perfect location for the future wine tasting venue.

The Shanagolden Block was originally settled in 1867 by James Leslie, a Scot who had emigrated to New Zealand at the age of 17.  He and his partner, Thomas Kinross followed the Dunstan gold rush.  Kinross established the Gibbston store and Post Office and James Leslie was the butcher and baker but also continued to prospect for gold.

The vineyard has a micro-climate that produces ripe fruit earlier than most in the general area.  The soil composition is made up of glacial deposits and free draining alluvial soil matter (scheist).  This terrior is well suited to the cool weather grape varietals that Waitiri Creek produces.  This is where Jens’s Willamette Valley winemaking experience really shines.

Waitiri Creek’s portfolio of wines includes Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Pinot Gris, Riesling, and Sauvignon Blanc.  The grape vines  of Waitiri Creek are all hand pruned and hand harvested.  New Zealand is aiming for all of its vineyards to be sustainably accredited by the end of 2012.  Compliance currently stands at about 93% – Waitiri Creek has been fully sustainable for some years.  Another interesting fact about New Zealand wines, 75% of the bottles are all screw tops.  The Kiwi’s are an environmentally conscience country and I applaud them for this effort.

Chardonnay Grape Harvest

Chardonnay Grape Harvest

The first vintage of Chardonnay was produced in 1998 and full production of three different varietals in 1999.   In 1996  Paula and Allistar decided that an old church building would serve as the Waitiri Creek tasting room, they needed a structure that would be harmonious with the terroir of the Shanagolden vineyard.  So a search which led them all over the lower part of the South Island, culminating in a visit to Wangaloa, near Kaitangata in 1998.  On first sight, the former Wangaloa Presbyterian Church would have sent less hardy souls running in the opposite direction….but not Paula and Allistar.  Negotiations began with the local community and ownership of the church was secured a year later.

Cellar Door

Cellar Door

The Waitiri Creek tasting room just celebrated its 10th anniversary at its new vineyard home.   This former Presbyterian church, built in 1893 was moved to its new location at Waitiri Creek 300km in one piece on the Shanagolden Block in 2000.

I want to thank my new friend Paula Ramage for sharing this rich history of the Central Otago wine region, New Zealand, and the Waitiri Creek Winery with the WineGuyMike™ audience.  From my home in Montana to the “The Long and Winding Road” down under, Happy Holidays to my friends in New Zealand and Waitiri Creek.

Waitiri Creek Wines

One of the keys to increased demand for Waitiri Creek wines is consistant quality.   Waitiri Creek has been recognized at domestic and international competitions every year since 1999 across their entire portfolio.  Their expansion into Bannockburn with the purchase of additional Central Otago fruit has now expanded their portfolio to include Rosé, Pinot Gris, Sauvignon Blanc and Riesling.

Pinot Noir

Waitiri Creek Pinot Noir 2007 The nose shows rich varietal layers of cherry and plums supported by an earthy complexity. The depth of fruit on the nose continues on the palate supported by a fine tannin structure, good integration of oak and a length of flavor that lingers on the tongue.

The nose displays complex notes of stewed cherries, cedar and mushrooms. This Pinot Noir shows the elegance of the 2008 vintage with a bright garnet hue and the perfume of violets and rose petals. The fruit driven palate has flavors of wild raspberries with hints of cinnamon, red cherries and succulent plums. On the finish there is a note of thyme and mushrooms. The silky tannins are woven seamlessly into a structure balanced by savory French oak and alcohol.

Rose

Rich strawberry and raspberry aromas dominate the nose and are supported by perfumed floral notes. The palate shows good berry fruit weight with strawberry and white peach aided by creamy texture. This wine is well balanced with a long, lingering, strawberry finish.

Chardonnay

Made in a fruit-driven New World style, this wine shows all the influences of classic Old World winemaking. The palate is rich and succulent with an appealing texture and displays outstanding primary fruit.

Handpicked grapes were whole bunch pressed and the juice cold settled for two days before being racked to barrels with light yeast. The wine was then cool fermented using both commercial and indigenous yeasts. This Chardonnay spent 10 months in 100% French oak (22% new oak) and underwent 100% malolatic fermentation with weekly lees stirring. The finished wine was then racked, lightly fined and filtered prior to bottling in late-March 2009.

Riesling

This Riesling shows complex aromas of mandarin, pear, honeysuckle and orange blossom on the nose. The body has crisp citrus flavors, offset with spice and good length of finish. This wine has great cellaring potential and additional characters will develop in the bottle over time.

Riesling grapes from two different blocks were handpicked and combined. The grapes were whole bunch pressed using a bag press and then the juice was left to cold settle overnight, before being racked and inoculated with yeast.

Fermentation lasted several weeks with temperatures being maintained less than 13 degrees to retain optimum flavor. Once fermentation was complete the wine was sulphured, racked and blended. The wine was then lightly fined and cold and protein stabilized prior to sterile filtration and bottling in September 2008.

Pinot Gris

Floral and pear notes on the nose lead into a richly textured palate of nashi pear, citrus and spice flavors. The long finish is balanced by fine acidity.

First vintage fruit from Legends (Legends Vineyard, Felton Road) was hand-harvested.  One tank of the Legends juice was chilled with daily lees stirring for four days.  It was then racked taking light lees to blend with the second tank of Legends juice which was settled for one night and then racked clean to blend.  A portion of this juice went to a neutral French Oak barrel.  The blended Legends juice was warmed naturally to 14ºC and innoculated with an aromatic yeast before undergoing cool fermentation until optimal balance was achieved.

The fruit from Annika’s (Annika’s Vineyard, Wanaka Road) was hand-harvested with 50% left on skins overnight while the balance was cold settled overnight and racked with light lees.  The fruit with extended skin contact was racked cleanly.  The two Annika’s components were blended, warmed naturally to 14ºC and fermented using aromatic yeast.  A percentage of this juice was fermented in two neutral French Oak barrels.

The three barrels were stirred regularly after the peak of fermentation and then blended. The two separate tank blends were blended in August and underwent cold and protein stabilization before being lightly fined with isinglass and sterile filtered before bottling.

Sauvignon Blanc

For her 6th birthday, our niece Stella Paris Columbia B. Ramage who lives in Sydney and loves art had a wine named after her. This is a single vineyard, Gibbston fruit.

Stella

Stella

A nose of passionfruit, gooseberry and capsicum aromas lead to a lively palate displaying good balance and zesty acidity. Best served lightly chilled.

Sauvignon Blanc grapes were handpicked and then was de-stemmed and crushed prior to gentle pressing. The resulting juice was cool stainless steel fermented to retain fruit character. The wine was left on yeast lees for two months to help with mouth feel and complexity. The resulting wine was fined with milk casein prior to filtration and bottling.

"from my table to yours"

“from my table to yours”

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This Week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© Pairing Wine And Food Made Simple

Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and U 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 11:00AM MST.

It’s 2013 — welcome back to the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©.  I decided on today’s show topic as it occurred to meet late in 2012 how important relationships are, something I have always known of course.  But I took a moment to reflect on just how important it is in this chaotic world to take a moment, no matter how busy I am, for friends and family.

One of the ways that I do this in my life is to share wine and food with you, my friends on air and also through wine tastings and intimate dinners with friends and family.  Interestingly enough today’s show is all about pairing wines and food so we will be talking about balance which is also the point of today’s commentary for the New Year, finding a balanced and more harmonious lifestyle.

In approaching the topic of pairing wine and food let’s remember the number one rule on the WineGuyMike show, we have no rules.  All kidding aside this is a great guideline to be bound by no rules, but I will say when a wine is well paired with a meal it is a bite of nirvana.

There is much mystique and some draconian like attitude surrounding wine and food pairing, this can be unfortunate.  The hard-line approach is sometimes common amongst want to be wine experts and myopically focused sommeliers. Pairing wine and food should be fun, exciting, and a little challenging as you are thinking about a preparation for a special social gathering albeit large or small and intimate.  I am not suggesting that considering a few very common sense guidelines will not enhance your enjoyment of wine and food because it will.  My encouragement is to not over think this process, consider your guest(s), and to enjoy the moment.

When one considers wine and food thinking about balance is helpful. The balance of both weight and texture of wine and food is a good place to start when determining what wine works best with what food.  Here are a few other things to think about when choosing a wine too:

  • What wine do you like to drink?  Perhaps more important what type of wine does your guest like to drink?  Finding the right wine amongst two friends in itself is an act of pairing, is it not?
  • Consider the texture of the food, is it heavy or light?  Is it a rich or light dish?
  • How is the food prepared, has it been Grilled, Baked, or Sautéed?
  • What about sauce? Sauce has a significant impact on food, is there a gravy, crème or tomato sauce in addition to the food itself?

In considering balance, and in this case I’m referring to weight and texture of the main food entrée and the weight and texture of the wine, I will be choosing the appropriate wine to serve with my dinner.  What is my method of food preparation?  Am I dining in a restaurant?  This too can be a double edged sword as my guest more than likely will be ordering something very different than I will.  So now I have to find a wine that is suitable for both meals, or if the establishment serves wines by the glass and I know their wines have been handled correctly that will be an option for choosing the right wine with the entrée.

Here are a couple more things to consider while contemplating the most appropriate wine to serve with dinner.  Just as foods have texture and firmness wines also have a quality of texture and weight.  Remember we are looking for balance and synergy between wine and the foods they are paired with.  A big robust full bodied wine bold on texture should not be paired with delicate dishes, nor should they be paired with a food dish that is big on flavor.  Big wine and big flavor just don’t work well together, we are looking for that simple harmony between food and wine, not a power struggle.  Mild food dishes do well when they are paired with a wine that is medium to light in body.

What then are some of the basic parameters to consider when pairing wine and food?  When choosing wine the preference is medium to lighter bodied wines that have a balance of fruit and acid, have soft supple tannin qualities, and have moderate alcohol levels.  The best white wine to use in pairing wine and food are Pinot Gris or, as it is known in Italy Pinot Grigio, and Chenin Blanc.  Both of these white wines have a great fruit profile and the acid is a little higher than other grapes and the acid is what brings out the flavor so wonderfully in food.

When it comes to red wines there are a couple of things to consider.  Just like your white wines medium to light bodied wines are best when pairing with food along with the other attributes I just mentioned.  The red varietals that will always work great with food are; Barbera, Gamay, and Pinot Noir.  There is a new wine on the block too that works very well with food, Frappato.  This grape is a native Sicilian grape that is in favor with cult wine drinkers who enjoy pairing wine and food.   Another good rule of thumb to remember with red wines is that if they are light enough to see through in a glass they will work with food fairly well.

In closing I would like you to remember to consider what is really important, the relationship with your dinner partner or guests and please don’t over think the wine and food pairing.  It’s just not that complicated or important, you should enjoy what you and your guest(s) like.  I want to wish all of my listeners an a New Year filled with thoughtful relationships, and good health.  With this thought in mind I toast to you.

Be sure to check out the blog at WineGuyMike.com for my wine suggestions and if you live in Missoula be sure to visit Liquid Planet for your ultimate wine shopping experience.  I’ll see you on the radio friends.

For a great selection of wines to pair you food with be sure to visit Liquid Planet, Missoula’s “Best of Beverage”, located in the Heart of Downtown Missoula.

The  wines suggested today receive the WineGuyMike™ Seal of Approval™   www.wineguymike.com is your wine resource.

From my table to yours,

 

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YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebookhttp://on.fb.me/hvHsil please “like”

Twitter; https://twitter.com/WineGuyMike

Todays podcast on pairing wine and food; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2013/01/06/wine-guy-mike-for-january-6/

This weeks WineGuyMike YouTube preview on pairing wine and food; http://youtu.be/DAcXPbZr0TI

Last Weeks podcast on Champagne and Sparkling Wines; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/12/30/wine-guy-mike-for-december-30/

Recent podcast with wine visionary David Adelsheim of Adelsheim Vineyard; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/12/23/wine-guy-mike-for-december-23rd/

Recent podcast featuring Christophe Hedges of Hedges Family Estate; http://www.trail1033.com/Podcasts/Podcast-Wine-Guy-Mike-for-December-9-554603

YouTube preview for this week’s show featuring David Adelsheim of Adelsheim Vineyard; http://youtu.be/i8cwHoT0Dpk

Recent podcast; (full length conversation) with Maximilian Riedel, CEO Riedel Crystal of America http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/06/24/wine-guy-mike-for-june-24/

NBC Montana Today TV Segment; Perfect Patio Wines and food pairing; http://www.nbcmontana.com/news/Mike-Tornatore-8-7-12/-/14594602/15999458/-/67a5ri/-/index.html

 

Champagne and Sparkling Wines, “All You Need To Know”

 

This week WineGuyMike™ writes all about all things bubbly for your New Year Celebration and understanding the differences between Champagne, Sparkling Wine, Cava, Prosecco, and Spumante.  In this post, I am also suggesting sparkling wines in a variety of price ranges that offer the consumer value.

What is the difference between Champagne and Sparkling wine?  Sparkling wines and champagne are still wines that have been infused with carbonation. True Champagne is made in France will be noted by the capital letter “C” on the label.  Other sparkling wines called Champagne will be designated as “champagne”, notice no capitalization. Three grapes are used in Champagne, Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir, and Chardonnay.  It’s white because only the juice of the grapes is used.

The four methods of Sparkling wine production:

1. Carbon Dioxide Injection – soft drinks and inexpensive sparkling wines are produced using this method.  It produces large bubbles that dissipate quickly.

2. Charmat Process – wine undergoes a second fermentation in large bulk tanks and is bottled under pressure.  Prosecco and Asti are produced utilizing this method, smaller longer lasting bubbles result from this method.  Many Sparkling wines are made using this method.

3. Méthode Champenoise – this process takes place in the bottle and requires hands on attention.  During the second fermentation, the carbon dioxide stays in the bottle and this is where the bubbles come from.

4. Transfer Method – the cuvee is bottled for the second fermentation which adds complexity.  But the wine is then removed and stored in large tanks after it has spent the appropriate amount of time on yeast.

Champagne:

The Champagne region of France not only produces some of the finest sparkling wines in the world but some of the finest wines in the world too.  Typically there are three grapes used in the blend for sparkling wines; Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Pinot Meunier.  Different vintages are used to create the blend or better known as the “Cuvee”.

Champagne is expensive due to the traditional method of how it is made, Methode Champenoise and techniques known as second fermentation.  This process takes place in the bottle and requires hands-on attention.

Pink Champagne or sparkling Rose is strained through the Pinot Noir grape skins, truly a delight.  Methode Champenoise is the true French fermentation process.  The wine is fermented twice, once in an oak barrel, and the second time the wine develops carbonation in the bottle while aging a minimum of one year.

Blanc de Blancs is true French Champagne, it is produced entirely from the Chardonnay grape.  Blanc de Blancs fermented using the Methode Champenoise process, producing white Champagne.

Designations of quality:

Prestige Cuvee

This Champagne is the highest priced and is available only in small quantities.  It is designated “Prestige” because the grapes come from the best grapes from the highest rated villages, it is made from the first pressing of the grapes, produced only as a vintage, and will have been aged longer than vintage and non-vintage Champagnes.

Vintage Champagne

Some select years produce an outstanding grape harvest.  The Vintage Champagnes are aged for at least three years.  Here is an example of a few companies who produce these Vintage Champagnes; Veuve Clicquot, Perrier-Jouet, Moet & Chandon, and Taittinger.

Remember a Vintage Champagne will be identified by an actual year marked on the label, but expect to pay a premium for this.

Non-Vintage Champagne

The majority of Sparkling wine on the shelf of a store is non-vintage.  These are a blend of wines aged for two years.

How to Select your Champagne:

■Brut is Dry

■Extra Dry is Semidry

■Sec is Semisweet

■Demi-sec is Sweet

Quality Champagne Cellars:

Ayala, Billecart-Salmon, J. Bollinger, Canard-Duchene, Deutz, Charles Heidsieck, Heid Sieck Monopole, Henriot, Krug, Lanson, Laurent Perrier, Mercier, Moet & Chandon, Mumm Perrier-Jouet, Joseph Perrier, Piper Heidsieck, Pol Roger, Pommery, Louis Roederer, Ruinart, Salmon, Taittinger, Veuve Clicquot

All things are not at equal when it comes to sparkling wines and Champagne.  So what makes all of these types of sparkling wines different?  The answer is how they are made, the type of grapes, and the yeasts that are used in fermentation and left behind in the bottle to age with the sparkling wines.

There are 2-3 elements of wine that create aroma and flavor.  The first element is the fruit, and the second is the yeast used to ferment the wine.  Fruit and yeast combine during fermentation to produce aroma and flavor or sense of taste.  The third influence upon the wine in your glass may be from an oak influence during the wines aging process.

Other sparkling Wine Regions:

Loire Valley of France produces Crémant, while the Asti region of Italy produces Asti Spumanti, and Prosecco comes from the Veneto region.  The Catalonia region of Spain produces the world’s most popular sparkling wine, Cava.  Quality sparkling wines made in Italy are made by the Metodo Classico process or what the French refer to as Methode Champenoise.

Prosecco is an Italian wine, generally a dry sparkling wine, usually made from grape variety Glera, which is also known as Prosecco.  The Veneto region of Italy is where Glera/ Prosecco is grown and produced.

Prosecco is mainly produced as a sparkling wine in either the fully sparkling (spumante) or lightly sparkling (frizzante, gentile) styles.  Prosecco spumante, which has undergone a full secondary fermentation, is the more expensive style.  The various sparkling wines may contain some Pinot Bianco or Pinot Grigio wine.  Depending on their sweetness, Proseccos are labeled “brut”, “extra dry”, or “dry”, with the brut being the driest.

Unlike Champagne, Prosecco does not ferment in the bottle consequently the wine goes off or gets old quickly and should be drunk as young as possible, preferably within one year.

Prosecco is Italy’s answer to refreshing, well-made, sparkling wine that is low in alcohol, about 11 to 12 percent by volume.  Created from predominately Prosecco grapes in the northern Veneto region of Italy in the foothills of the Alps.  Prosecco is light, affordable, and fun.  This Sparkling wine is aromatic and crisp, with nuances of yellow apple, citrus, pear, white peach, and apricot.  Today’s Proseccos tend to be dry and very bubbly and typically will present itself as light, fresh, with an initial intense bouquet/aroma, but simple and straightforward compared to Champagne.

Prosecco is made using the Charmat method rather than the Champagne method, the French method of making sparkling wine.  The Charmat method is a second fermentation in pressurized tanks rather than in individual bottles.  The shorter, tank fermentation is preferable for Prosecco because it preserves the freshness and the flavor of the grapes.

Asti Spumante is a sweet sparkling wine.  It is produced in the province of Asti and made from the Moscato grape.  Spumante is a fruit forward sparkling wine that is grapy, and has a low alcohol content usually around 8%.  Moscato d’Asti is a sparkling wine that is frizzante in style and for my palette I find these wines to be more refined than the Asti Spumante.

Cava originated in the Catalonia region at the in the late 19th century.  Originally the wine was known as Champaña until Spanish producers officially adopted the term “Cava” (cellar) in 1970.  Cava wines are fermented and aged in the bottle in underground cellars.   Today 95% of Spain’s total Cava production is from Catalonia.

Cava is produced in different styles ranging from dry to sweet; Brut Nature, Brut (extra dry), Seco (dry), Semiseco (medium) and Dulce (sweet).  Under Spanish Denominación de Origen laws, Cava can be produced in six wine regions and must be made according to the Traditional Method with second fermentation in the bottle.  The grapes used to produce Cava are Macabeo, Parellada, Xarel·lo, Chardonnay, Pinot noir, and Malvasia.  The Chardonnay grape is a latecomer to the scene despite being a traditional grape used to produce Champagne.  It was not introduced in the production of Cava until the 1980s.

In order for the wines to be called ‘Cava’, they must be made in the traditional Méthode Champenoise.  Wines made via the low-cost Charmat process may only be called ‘Spanish sparkling wine’.   A rosé style of Cava is also produced by adding in small amounts of red wines from Cabernet Sauvignon, Garnacha or Monastrell to the wine.

Cava made by the Champagne method is a very acceptable alternative to French champagne.  Cava is usually made by the Coupage method, whereby must, a.k.a.(grape juice) from different grape varieties are subjected to the first fermentation which is blended until it is consistent with the wine that the winemaker wants to produce.  After the Coupage, the wine is put into bottles and yeast and sugar added.  It is then cellared for the second fermentation and aging.

Crémant is produced in the Loire Valley of France and is the largest producer of sparkling wines outside of the Champagne region.  Crémant has to be aged for at least one year and it is handpicked.  The producers are also limited as to how much can be harvested, this all according to the French A.O.C.

There are seven French appellations that carry the Crémant designation in their name:

1.Crémant d’Alsace

2.Crémant de Bordeaux

3.Crémant de Bourgogne

4.Crémant de Die

5.Crémant du Jura

6.Crémant de Limoux

7.Crémant de Loire

Crémant de Loire’s are a blend of the Chardonnay, Chenin Blanc, and Cabernet Franc.  In Burgundy, Crémant de Bourgogne must be composed of at least thirty percent Pinot noir, Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc or Pinot Gris while Aligoté is often used to complement the blend.  The Languedoc region in the south of France produces Crémant de Limoux.  This Sparkling wine is produced from the indigenous grape Mauzac, with Chenin blanc, and Chardonnay rounding out the wine in small amounts.

The Crémant Sparkling Wines are pressurized less than Champagne and therefore have a larger looser bubble as a result.

California Sparkling Wines:

Sparkling wines from California use a few grape varietals such as Berger and Chenin Blanc to blend with the traditional Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes.

Producers to look for in California; Hacienda, Domain Laurier, Roederer Estate, Domaine Carneros, Domaine Chandon, Codorniu-Napa, Iron Horse, Jordan, Mumm-Cuvee Napa, and Schramsberg.

Remember the name “Champagne” can only be used in Europe on bottles that actually are produced in the Champagne region of France.

As a consumer, you now are empowered by the information WineGuyMike™ has shared with you.  I would like to wish you a happy, healthy, and prosperous New Year.

From my table to yours,

 

 

This Week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© David Adelsheim of Adelsheim Vineyard

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Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and U 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 11:00AM MST.

Social Media links;

Current weeks podcast with wine visionary David Adelsheim of Adelsheim Vineyard; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/12/23/wine-guy-mike-for-december-23rd/

Last Weeks Podcast featuring Christophe Hedges of Hedges Family Estate; http://www.trail1033.com/Podcasts/Podcast-Wine-Guy-Mike-for-December-9-554603

YouTube preview for this week’s show featuring David Adelsheim of Adelsheim Vineyard; http://youtu.be/i8cwHoT0Dpk

Recent podcast; (full length conversation) with Maximilian Riedel, CEO Riedel Crystal of America http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/06/24/wine-guy-mike-for-june-24/

NBC Montana Today TV Segment; Perfect Patio Wines and food pairing; http://www.nbcmontana.com/news/Mike-Tornatore-8-7-12/-/14594602/15999458/-/67a5ri/-/index.html

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebookhttp://on.fb.me/hvHsil please “like”

Twitter; https://twitter.com/WineGuyMike

Sleep City Missoula  www.SleepCity.com

Today’s full conversation podcast between David Adelsheim and WineGuyMike; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/12/23/wine-guy-mike-for-december-23rd/

 

Liquid Planet “Best of Beverage” and a great place to find your holiday wine located in the heart of downtown Missoula.

For a great selection on wine visit Liquid Planet, Missoula’s Best of Beverage, located in the Heart of Downtown Missoula.

The Hedges Family Estate wines reviewed today receive the WineGuyMike™ Seal of Approval™  

You can listen to the show live on the Trail 103.3FM or U 104.5FM.  These shows are podcast for your convenience and available on my blog at; www.WineGuyMike.wordpress.com or visit the new website at www.wineguymike.com

From my table to yours,

"from my table to yours"

This Week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© Christophe Hedges of Hedges Family Estate

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Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and U 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 11:00AM MST.

Social Media links;

This Weeks Podcast featuring Christophe Hedges of Hedges Family Estate; http://www.trail1033.com/Podcasts/Podcast-Wine-Guy-Mike-for-December-9-554603

YouTube preview for this week’s show featuring Christophe Hedges of Hedges Family Estate;

Recent podcast with Courtney Kingston of Kingston Family Vineyards; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/09/15/wine-guy-mike-for-september-16/

Recent Podcast with head winemaker of Balletto Vineyards & Winery, Mr. Anthony Beckman; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/07/29/wine-guy-mike-for-july-29/

Recent podcast; (full length conversation) with Maximilian Riedel, CEO Riedel Crystal of America http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/06/24/wine-guy-mike-for-june-24/

NBC Montana Today TV Segment; Perfect Patio Wines and food pairing; http://www.nbcmontana.com/news/Mike-Tornatore-8-7-12/-/14594602/15999458/-/67a5ri/-/index.html

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebookhttp://on.fb.me/hvHsil please “like”

Twitter; https://twitter.com/WineGuyMike

Sleep City Missoula  www.SleepCity.com

Today’s written story will be available later this afternoon, but here is what you really need to know. The wine notes…everyone a great wine and a great value. Listen to the full length conversation between featured guest Christophe Hedges and WineGuyMike right here; http://www.trail1033.com/Podcasts/Podcast-Wine-Guy-Mike-for-December-9-554603

Liquid Planet “Best of Beverage” and a great place to find your holiday wine located in the heart of downtown Missoula.

For a great selection on wine visit Liquid Planet, Missoula’s Best of Beverage, located in the Heart of Downtown Missoula.

The Hedges Family Estate wines reviewed today receive the WineGuyMike™ Seal of Approval™  

You can listen to the show live on the Trail 103.3FM or U 104.5FM.  These shows are podcast for your convenience and available on my blog at; www.WineGuyMike.wordpress.com or visit the new website at www.wineguymike.com

From my table to yours,

"from my table to yours"

This Week On The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show Chef Richard Bishop

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Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and U 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MST.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast Chef Richard Bishop of Classy Catering Creations; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/12/02/wine-guy-mike-for-december-2nd/

This week’s YouTube preview with Chef Richard Bishop of Classy Catering Creations;

Recent podcast with Courtney Kingston of Kingston Family Vineyards; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/09/15/wine-guy-mike-for-september-16/

Recent Podcast with head winemaker of Balletto Vineyards & Winery, Mr. Anthony Beckman; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/07/29/wine-guy-mike-for-july-29/

Recent week’s podcast; What You Need To Know About Wine  http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/07/15/wine-guy-mike-for-july-15/

Recent podcast; (full length conversation) with Maximilian Riedel, CEO Riedel Crystal of America http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/06/24/wine-guy-mike-for-june-24/

NBC Montana Today TV Segment; Perfect Patio Wines and food pairing; http://www.nbcmontana.com/news/Mike-Tornatore-8-7-12/-/14594602/15999458/-/67a5ri/-/index.html

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link:

http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sleep City Missoula  www.SleepCity.com

Liquid Planet “Best of Beverage” and a great place to find your holiday wine located in the heart of downtown Missoula.

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana

 This week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© Chef Richard Bishop of Classy Catering Creations joined me as my featured guest, we’re talking turkey.  Yes Thanksgiving is over but I want to know what to do with that carcass that I save every year.

Bishop hails from Mountain Home, Idaho which is located about 45 minutes outside of Boise.  Originally from the east coast Bishop moved his company, Classy Catering Creations, to Idaho in 2010.  Bishop’s catering company provides services ranging from small private dinners to large events.  CCC is focused on quality services, seasonal and local food sources.  Led by Chef Bishop this Rocky Mountain catering company delivers.

Classy Catering Creations

Classy Catering Creations is composed of a highly organized team of event planners, concept designers, managers and chefs.  Their desire is to create unique memorable events of unmatched structure and individual character.  The real strength of CCC is their long standing client relationships which are the foundation upon which their firm is built.

Chef Bishop and the team at CCC are available for consulting and it is worth a call to visit with a catering firm who really knows what they are doing.  In fact Chef Bishop has an extremely informative white paper he has written on “all things catering”.  Bishop will even share this with you if you give him a call.

Be sure to take a look at Classy Catering Creations website, http://classycateringcreations.com, and you can give Chef Bishop a call at 208-696-1114.  The following recipes were provided by Chef Richard Bishop and WineGuyMike™ has recommended three inexpensive yet exceptional wines.  These pairings a match made in heaven and I know you’ll enjoy these as much as I have. 

Thanks to Chef Bishop for joining me on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© this week, I finally know how to utilize my Thanksgiving turkey carcass and make a great soup to share with family and friends.  Cheers to Chef Bishop and his team at Classy Catering Creations.  I’ll see you on the radio.

Turkey Stock
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
Author: Richard Bishop
Ingredients
  • 2 Tablespoons – Vegetable Oil
  • 2 Tablespoons – Butter
  • 1 – Onion (quartered)
  • 1 – Carrot (thickly sliced)
  • 2 – Stalks of Celery (roughly chopped)
  • 1 – Head of Garlic (halved crosswise)
  • 1 Tablespoon – Kosher Salt
  • 3 – Sprigs Thyme
  • 1 – Bay Leaf
  • 1 Tablespoon – Black Peppercorns
  • Turkey carcass and wings
  • 2 Gallons – Water

Instructions

  1. If you have Boquet of Garni bags add the garlic, thyme, bay leaf, and peppercorns to the bag and place the bag into the stock pot. This makes is a little easier to remove the herbs when ready.
  2. In a large stock pot add the butter and the vegetable oil and bring it to a medium heat. Then add the vegetables and allow them to sweat. You dont want color you just want the onions translucent.
  3. Add the remaining ingredients in a large stockpot. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer.
  4. Skim any impurities that rise to the surface as they occur. Simmer for 3 hours. Remove the garni bag if applicable then strain through a fine mesh strainer and discard solids.

Turkey Soup
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
Author: Chef Richard Bishop
Ingredients
  • 8-10 pound – Turkey (removed from bones)
  • 1½ gallons – Turkey Stock (made from Turkey)
  • 2 tablespoon – Unsalted Butter
  • 1 – Large Onion (diced)
  • 2 – Large Carrots (diced)
  • 1 – Bunch Celery (diced)
  • 2 – Cloves Garlic (minced)
  • 1 cup – Tarragon (chopped)
  • Roasted Turkey Meat pulled and roughly chopped
 Instructions
  1. Heat butter over medium in a large stockpot. Add the vegetables with a large pinch of salt, and sweat the vegetables until translucent.
  2. Add the pulled turkey and stock, cover and bring to a simmer. Continue to simmer for 45 minutes.

Classic Dumpling                                                                                    Prep time Cook time Total time Author: Chef Richard Bishop                                                              Ingredients

  1. 1 cup – Flour
  2. 2 – Eggs
  3. ¼ cup – Milk
  4. ¼ cup – Parsley
  5. ¼ cup – Chopped Shallots

Instructions

  1. Make a well in the flour in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together eggs and milk.
  2. Add the eggs and milk mixture to the well, then add the parsley and shallots and whisk all together until smooth.
  3. Usting a cutting board and knife cut bite sized pieces into the desired broth or stock which they will be accompanying. (Keep in mind the will expand some when cutting them into the liquid.)

WineGuyMike™ recommendations, pair these excellent wines with Chef Richard’s recipe for turkey soup and dumplings.

Liquid Planet offers an excellent selection of fine wine to compliment your dinners, Missoula’s “Best of Beverage”, located in the Heart of Downtown Missoula.

The wines reviewed today receive the WineGuyMike™ Seal of Approval™

You can listen to the show live on the Trail 103.3FM or U 104.5FM.  These shows are podcast for your convenience and available on my blog at; www.WineGuyMike.wordpress.com or visit the new website at www.wineguymike.com

From my table to yours,

"from my table to yours"

This Week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© Jamie Stewart Brand Ambassador for Ferrari Sparkling Wines Part 2

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Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and U 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MST.

Social Media links;

Last Weeks Podcast featuring Ferrari Sparkling Wines Part 1; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/11/18/wine-guy-mike-november-18-2012/

YouTube preview for this week’s show featuring Ferrari Sparkling Wines from Trento, Italy;


Recent podcast with Courtney Kingston of Kingston Family Vineyards; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/09/15/wine-guy-mike-for-september-16/

Recent Podcast with head winemaker of Balletto Vineyards & Winery, Mr. Anthony Beckman; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/07/29/wine-guy-mike-for-july-29/

Recent podcast; (full length conversation) with Maximilian Riedel, CEO Riedel Crystal of America http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/06/24/wine-guy-mike-for-june-24/

NBC Montana Today TV Segment; Perfect Patio Wines and food pairing; http://www.nbcmontana.com/news/Mike-Tornatore-8-7-12/-/14594602/15999458/-/67a5ri/-/index.html

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebookhttp://on.fb.me/hvHsil please “like”

Twitter; https://twitter.com/WineGuyMike

Sleep City Missoula  www.SleepCity.com

Liquid Planet “Best of Beverage” and a great place to find your holiday wine located in the heart of downtown Missoula.

Thank you for joining me this Sunday morning on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© for Part 2 with Jamie Stewart Brand Ambassador for Ferrari Sparkling Wines.

La Lunelli Famiglia

Established in northern Italy’s Trentino region over a century ago, Ferrari has earned a worldwide reputation as the premier source of luxury metodo classico sparkling wines from Italy.

The legend of Ferrari began with a man, Giulio Ferrari, and with his dream of creating a wine in Italy inspired by the very finest French Champagne.  A skilled and painstaking enologist Ferrari studied at the prestigious School of Viticulture in Montpellier, France.

Ferrari was founded in 1902 by Giulio Ferrari.  After studying in France, Giulio returned to Trentino convinced that his native region’s terroir was ideal for growing Chardonnay grapes suitable for the production of world-class sparkling wines.  A pioneer in Italian viticulture, Ferrari was the first Italian winemaker and viticulturalist to dedicate his vineyards almost entirely to Chardonnay – and by 1906 Ferrari was producing award winning sparkling wines.  Ferrari was well on its way to producing what would soon become the most famous sparkling wine in all of Italy.

Trentino – Alto Adige is a region located in the northeastern portion of Italy featuring two distinct areas.  Trento is located in the southern portion of the region and is steeped in Italian culture.  The Alto Adige area is located in the northern territory at a higher altitude near the Adige River and is predominantly a Germanic culture.

Cantine Ferrari’s vineyards are located in the Trento area, situated on south facing high altitude slopes.  The Adige River runs parallel to the vineyards and is governed by the Trento D.O.C.  During the day warm Mediterranean influences from the Veneto wine region flow into the vineyards surrounding Trento.  Late afternoon glacial breezes from the Dolomite Mountains in the Italian Alps funnel cool air into the vineyards. The cool night air slows the ripening process, concentrating the fruit and sugar of the grapes. Glacial water rich in mineral content is another important component of Trento’s terroir, aiding in producing spectacular grapes.

The bouquet and flavor of Ferrari sparkling wines is second to none due in part to exceptional winemaking led by chief winemaker Marcello Lunelli. Proprietary yeast cultures developed by Giulio Ferrari, glacial water rich in minerals, and ideal growing conditions are also important components of Ferrari sparkling wine.

Ferrari is a 22-time winner of the Tre Bicchieri award, Italy’s highest wine accolade.

The Ferrari Sparkling Brut is available at Liquid Planet, Missoula’s “Best of Beverage”, located in the Heart of Downtown Missoula.

The Ferrari sparkling wines reviewed today receive the WineGuyMike™ Seal of Approval™  Guilio Ferrari Saprkling Wine is the only sparkling wine served at the Vatican.  If it is good enough for the Pope…

You can listen to the show live on the Trail 103.3FM or U 104.5FM.  These shows are podcast for your convenience and available on my blog at; www.WineGuyMike.wordpress.com or visit the new website at www.wineguymike.com

From my table to yours,

"from my table to yours"