Author Archives: WineGuyMike

Summer Is Coming Wine Event With Wine Guy Mike

Join me for Summer Is Coming Wine Event With Wine Guy Mike. Scratch Catering will be serving delicious Charcuterie and Cheese selections to enjoy with an adventurous flight of 5 wines. This event is sure to deliver an evening of fun and learning all about new wines!

Wine Guy Mike Wine Events

Wine Guy Mike Wine Events

Celebrate Summer with a flight of 5 distinct wines of character and world class cured meats and organic cheese selections.

Scratch Catering Chacuterie and Cheese Platters

Event Date: May 18th, 2017 From 6:30pm-9:30pm

Where: Katie O’Keefe’s 2100 Stephens Ave, Missoula, Montana 59801

Ticket Price: $25.00 per person and you must be 21 years of age to purchase tickets and attend the event.

Purchase Your Ticket Now by Clicking This Link:  

Price: $25.00  

Detail: Tickets must be purchased no later that May 17th at 12:00 Noon. If you would like to attend and are unable to purchase tickets online you are welcome to join in the fun by contacting Wine Guy Mike at mike@wineguymike.com or call or text (this is best) at           406-370-7162

I will hope to see you there for this great evening of fun and learn all about wine!

From my table to yours,

The Tasting Room Presents Justin Vajgert Of Reininger Winery

Wine Guy Mike

Wine Guy Mike

Live Stream The Tasting Room Click Here on KFGM 105.5 FM from 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm MDT

This week The Tasting Room presents Justin Vajgert of Reininger Winery in the Walla Walla Valley AVA.  Today’s guest is  Justin Vajgert, National Brand Sales Manager for the Reininger Winery and Helix wines. Today’s Podcast Click Here 

Justin Vajgert of Reininger Winery and Helix Wines

Justin Vajgert of Reininger Winery and Helix Wines

Justin and I are talking about the Walla Walla Valley area in Washington State and its wine. Walla Walla officially became an American Viticulture Area in 1984 but it was settled by Italian immigrants in the 1850’s who realized its potential to grow grapes. Chuck Reininger is the owner and head winemaker at Reininger Winery but first I want to give you a little background on today’s guest.

Chuck Reininger Head Winemaker of Reininger Winery

Chuck Reininger Head Winemaker of Reininger Winery

Justin’s background is a similar journey of many guests I have the pleasure of talking with on The Tasting Room. Justin grew up just outside of Chicago and relocated to the Walla Walla area in 2005 to attend the Institute for Viticulture and Enology. He worked the grape harvest in 2005 with Waterbrook Winery in Walla Walla. It was shortly thereafter that he joined forces with the Reininger Winery in November of 2005.

The Reininger Winery is located in the heart of the Walla Walla Valley. Head winemaker, Chuck Reininger, specializes in crafting elegant and finely structured red wines from hand-harvested, ultra premium grapes.

Reininger Winery tasting room in Walla Walla

Reininger Winery tasting room in Walla Walla

Glacial Lake Missoula was a prehistoric glacial lake in Western Montana that existed periodically at the end of the last ice age.  As warming periodically occurred Lake Missoula would flood carrying its alluvial soil matter to Washington State, and to the Walla Walla American Viticulture Area.

The Walla Walla area soils are composed of alluvial soil material and layers of volcanic ash from eruptions throughout history. These layers of soil and rock have created ideal soil conditions to grow grapes in.  The days are warm to hot and the night air is cool, perfect for growing world-class grapes that make fabulous wines.

Justin worked at Reininger Winery all through school doing everything from cellar work, to pouring wine in the tasting room, to painting bathrooms, when you work at a winery everyone does what needs to be done.

It was during Justin’s tenure that his roles evolved and he moved into a sales role beginning with local sales and then after the school moved into his current national sales position.  He’s been doing that ever since.  Distribution for the Reininger and Helix brands has grown to 17 states.  Justin eventually would like to make wine though, it’s his passion.

Let’s sit back and listen to my conversation with Justin Vajgert from the Reininger and Helix wine labels and learn a little more about these gems from Walla Walla.

Tasting Notes

The 2011 Reininger Merlot grapes are from the Pepper Bridge and Seven Hills Vineyards and are 100% Merlot. This wine has been barrel aged in 53% French, 47% American, and 5% new oak for 2 years.

2011 Reininger Merlot Walla Walla Valley

2011 Reininger Merlot Walla Walla Valley

This is a big, powerful, and robust Merlot, with very ripe fruit balanced by sweet oak spice from the French and American oak.  The fruit aromatics and flavors are of dark cherry, ripe plum, spicy tobacco, caramel and toasty oak. A touch of acidity lifts the fruit forward toward the end for a long, bright finish.

The Helix 2013 Pomotia is a blend of grapes from the Pepper Bridge, Phinny Hill, Seven Hills, Stillwater Creek, Stone Tree, Weinbau and XL vineyards. The blend is 40% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Syrah, 18% Merlot, 12% Cabernet Franc and has been barrel aged for 2 years. The nose is lovely and rich, sweet yet spicy, black currant, plum, cardamom, and violets an aroma that is downright captivating.

2013 Helix Pomatia Columbia Valley

2013 Helix Pomatia Columbia Valley

Its velvety texture bathes the palate with luscious black cherry and succulent dried dark fruit that’s stimulated by a soft yet vibrant acidity. On the finish, a gentle wave of focused fruit is a bobbing streak of perfumed wood spice impregnated with specs of loam. This wine is delicious!

The 2011 Helix Syrah is 100% Syrah; grapes are from the Phinny Hill, Stone Tree & Clifton Hill Vineyards, and is 100% Merlot. On the nose black currant, red berries, cherry, and a delicate sweetness.

2011 Helix Syrah Columbia Valley

2011 Helix Syrah Columbia Valley

The palate does not disappoint, rich and round with flavors of blue fruits and wonderful savory quality with a finish of tea and wet slate, this is a good thing. This wine has been barrel aged in 100% French Oak for 2 years.

I hope you enjoyed today’s wine program The Tasting Room. Please join me again next Sunday for a live interview with Boo Walker, Head of Global Sales and Marketing, and Author from Hedges Family Estate. Until then I will see you on the radio.

From my table to yours,

Rogue Creamery Cheese Monger Tom Van Voorhees on The Tasting Room

Wine Guy Mike

Wine Guy Mike

Today on The Tasting Room I am going to introduce you to Tom Van Voorhees, Cheese Monger for The Rogue Creamy located in Central Point, Oregon.

Live Stream The Tasting Room on KFGM 105.5 FM from 12:00 – 1:00MDT right here; http://tunein.com/radio/KFGM—Missoula-Community-Radio-s288054/?utm_source=tiEmbed&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=s288054

Today’s Podcast http://wp.me/P2JY6W-1jX

Tom Van Voorhees Cheese Monger at Rogue Creamery

Tom Van Voorhees Cheese Monger at Rogue Creamery

Tom and his wife relocated to Oregon from New York 10 years ago so Tom could begin his career as Cheese Monger at the Rogue Creamery. A Cheese Monger is the manager of the retail cheese department and they are responsible for managing the cheese inventory, selecting the cheese menu, purchasing, receiving, storing, and development of the cheese ripening. Tom has been officially recognized as the top Cheese Monger in the United States.

Tom and I have been friends for nearly 10 years now and I rely on him for cheese recommendations frequently. My catering company, Scratch Catering, serves Rogue Creamery cheese selections exclusively.

Rogue Valley AVA History

The Rogue Valley AVA wine history dates back to the 1840’s. European immigrants planted grapes and eventually bottled wines.  In 1852, an early settler, Peter Britt, began growing grapes and in 1873 founded Valley View Winery, Oregon’s first official winery.

A professor from Oregon State University planted an experimental test vineyard in the Rogue Valley AVA in 1968 and discovered this region was a great place to grow grapes and in 1972 the Wisnovsky family renewed the Vally View Winery namesake for their winery label.

There are four main growing areas in the Rogue Valley AVA, Bear Creek Valley, Illinois Valley, the Valley of the Rogue, and the Applegate Valley which in itself is its own AVA. Overall there are 16 federally approved AVA’s or viticulture growing areas in Oregon. The Rogue Valley AVA covers 1.15 million acres of intermountain valley area in Southern Oregon.

The Rogue Valley AVA Grape Varietals

Del Rio Vineyards from the Rogue Valley AVA

Del Rio Vineyards from the Rogue Valley AVA

Syrah, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, and Chardonnay are the major grape varietals that are predominant.  There are three valleys that have progressively warmer microclimates providing the Rogue Valley the diversity for growing both warm and cool climate grape varietals.  Pinot Noir is grown to the west as this microclimate is influenced by mountain and ocean winds that cool the area and to the east, the warm weather varieties thrive.  Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Sauvignon Blanc grow in the hills at elevations of nearly 2,000 feet producing grapes with concentrated fruit and sugar.

History of Rogue Creamery

The Rogue Creamery history spans nearly eight decades. Italian immigrant Tom Vella who had settled in the Sonoma, California area set his sights on the Rogue Valley as an area of opportunity to found a creamery. When Tom arrived it was small farms and pear orchards and the main industry was lumber. Tom was a visionary and entrepreneur opening the small creamery during the Depression, a gutsy move considering the lack of economic climate in the United States. Tom’s goal was to grow the creamery as fast as possible in order to provide employment and sustain the area’s small farms.  The farmers supported Tom in his endeavor.

The Southern Pacific Rail line that ran from Los Angeles, California to Seattle, Washington passed through Medford which is the larger city located right next to Central Point.  Passengers traveling between San Francisco, California and Seattle stopped to enjoy theatrical performances at the historic Holly Theatre.

Rogue Creamery Cheese Selections

Rogue Creamery Cheese Selections

The Rogue Creamery flourished during the Depression and provided significant amounts of Cheddar cheese for the troops that fought in World War II.  After the war, the Rogue Creamery changed focus and was retooled to serve civilian markets. Cottage cheese was very successfully introduced to the consumer market and served as the transition for the Rogue Creamery to become the premier producer of Blue Cheese that it is today.

Inspired by the success of the Cottage cheese Tom Vella knew he needed to grow his product base and Blue Cheese was on Tom’s radar. As the wise entrepreneur that he was, he decided to go right to the source of the best Blue Cheese in the world, Roquefort, France. It was there that Tom and his wife spent the summer of 1955. Tom’s good fortune, talent, and fluency in Italian opened many doors. The Roquefort Association, although shrouded in secrecy, welcomed Tom when he spoke to the supervisor of the facilities in the man’s native dialect. Presented with a gold pass signed by all functionaries of the Society, Tom toured operations from farms to cheese factories to the curing limestone caves at Cambalou. At summer’s end, Tom departed France with plans for a Roquefort type cheese factory, already producing Oregon Blue in his imagination.  Construction began in Central Point in 1956.

Tom envisioned caves similar to the environment of Cambalou and designed a building to duplicate that atmosphere.  Two Quonset-shaped half circled rooms of cement were poured, one over the other, with space in between for insulation. The result was a true cave-like atmosphere.

Rogue Creamery Retail Store

Rogue Creamery Retail Store

Production of blue began in early 1955, instant success validated Vella’s business acumen.  This was the first blue cheese produced in caves west of the Missouri River. Over the years Vella’s dedication to quality was unwavering to the end as was his enthusiasm for the business and the Rogue Valley.  He died on December 23, 1998, at age 100.

The Rogue Creamery was inherited by Tom’s family and his son Ignazio who became the driving force behind the creamery.  Ignazio’s reputation as “The Godfather of the artisan cheese industry” really says it all.  Ig, as he was known, stayed on as a mentor to current owners David Gremmels and Cary Bryant who are now the senior cheese makers.

Ig, Cary, and David

Ig, Cary, and David

Today, the Rogue Creamery is thriving. Gremmels and Bryant have steadfastly held to the principles laid out by Tom and Ig Vella. The creamery’s Mission Statement; An artisan cheese company, with people dedicated to service, sustainability and the art and tradition of making the world’s finest handmade cheese.

Rogue-River-Blue Cheese-with-certificates

Rogue-River-Blue Cheese-with-certificates

In the first two years under the leadership of Gremmels and Bryant, the Creamery had won numerous trophies and awards, including World’s Best Blue Cheese at the 2003 World Cheese Awards in London, a first for a U.S. creamery.

The Rogue Creamery produces some of the finest blue and cheddar cheese selections in the world. They are Certified Organic and are quickly headed to also being Certified Biodynamic. Here are a few cheese pairing tips from Cheese Monger Tom Van Voorhees.

Cheese Pairing Tips

Pairing Tips; Pair regional foods, wine, and beer together. Pair light colored wines and beers with fresh cheeses. Wines higher in tannin exaggerate flavors in cheese ie. fat, sharpness, sweetness and animal flavors.  Dessert wines pair nicely with cheeses that have a salty, sharp or bitter flavor.

Rogue Creamery Smokey Blue Cheese

Rogue Creamery Smokey Blue Cheese

  1. BLUE CHEESE; Generally pairs well with full-bodied red wines, or sweeter whites such as Gewürztraminer or late harvest dessert wine and Port is classic wine and cheese pairing.
  2. CHEDDAR; Generally pairs well with medium to dry white and red wines, especially the sharp and extra-sharp cheddars. Flavored cheddars, usually at the mild or medium level, will expand the selections in both categories of wine.  Don’t forget the beers – cheddars are classic companions to a variety of ales, stouts, and lagers.
  3. CURDS; Very light in traditional cheese characteristics; the flavoring agents become prevalent in the flavored varieties.  Curds pair well with most beers, and with lighter white and red wines.

It has been great having Tom Van Voorhees join me in The Tasting Room today and even better sampling the world-class cheese selections from the Rogue Creamery!

From my table to yours,

 

Kingston Vineyards On The Tasting Room With Wine Guy Mike

Wine Guy Mike

Wine Guy Mike

Live Stream The Tasting Room on KFGM 105.5 FM from 12:00 – 1:00MST right here; http://tunein.com/radio/KFGM—Missoula-Community-Radio-s288054/?utm_source=tiEmbed&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=s288054

Courtney Kingston

Courtney Kingston

Today on The Tasting Room with Wine Guy Mike, my special guest is Courtney Kingston, owner of Kingston Vineyards located in the Casablanca Valley of Chile. Kingston Vineyards is situated in the Western Hills of the Casablanca Valley in Chile.

Chile is a very narrow country that is 2600 miles in length from North to South. At its widest point though it is only 100 miles wide. The moderate Mediterranean climate is not only ideal for growing world-class grapes it has significant European influence stemming from the large number French, German, Spanish, and English that have relocated there.

There are three very distinct climate influences from the East to the West in Chile. Likewise, there are also three main grape growing regions that run from North to South in Chile. The Coastal Region is cool and moist from the Maritime influence, the Central Valley’s can be very warm, while the Andes Mountain region can be warm or very cool depending on the season and location.

Kingston Vineyards Casablanca Valley, Chile

Kingston Vineyards Casablanca Valley, Chile

The three major grape growing regions of Chile are the Casablanca Valley where they grow Sauvignon blanc, Chardonnay, and Pinot noir, this area is located within the Coastal region. The Maipo Valley produces Cabernet Sauvignon and is located in the Central Valley region while the Rapel and Colchagua Valley’s grow Cabernet Sauvignon, Carmenere, and Merlot grape varietals. These valleys are situated from North to South.

The migration of Europeans over time has influenced the arts, culture, styles of food, and certainly winemaking. Argentina and Chile both are considered New World winemaking countries, yet due to the outside influence of Europeans who have migrated to Chile, there can be an Old World winemaking influence. For Kingston Vineyards Old World winemaking methodologies are definitely present in their handling, fermenting and aging of their wines.

For instance, the majority use of Native yeast rather than commercial inoculated strains of yeast is an example of Old World winemaking technique. Another example is their winemakers use of older barrels for fermenting and aging Kingston wines, imparting far less tannin, aroma, and flavor to the wines. The Kingston Vineyard Chardonnay is partially fermented and aged in cement vats which are a technique used to have a neutral effect on the wine as opposed to wooden barrels that impart texture, aroma, and flavor or steel tanks that can impart a tart crispness, almost metallic style effect on a wine.

Interview with Courtney Kingston 

The three Kingston Vineyard Wines we are featuring today on The Tasting Room are the Tobiano Pinot noir, the Lucero Syrah, and the Cariblanco Sauvignon blanc.

The Tobiano Pinot noir is cold soaked for at least 5 days, this extracts the right amount of color and mellow’s the tannins. It is fermented utilizing mainly Native yeast allowing the grape to speak for itself. This wine was named for a Paint horse residing on the vineyard that looks as if it had a couple cans of paint throw on it.

Kingston Vineyards 2015 Tobiano Pinot noir

Kingston Vineyards 2015 Tobiano Pinot noir

The Lucero Syrah grapes are grown highest upon the hillsides at Kingston Vineyards where they receive the greatest amount of sunshine. The Syrah grapes from various blocks of the vineyard are cold soak fermented separately after being de-stemmed, although some of the grapes are fermented together as a whole cluster. The grapes are then put into older neutral wine barrels for a second native fermentation imparting a subtle smoothness into the final product, the wine.

Kingston Vineyards Horses

Kingston Vineyards Horses

Lucero is a horse from the farm that the vineyard is also located on. The horse was named for the bright white flash on his forehead!

Kingston Vineyards 2015 Lucero Syrah

Kingston Vineyards 2015 Lucero Syrah

The Kingston Vineyards Sabino Chardonnay has been fermented in French Oak Barrels and concrete tanks. Native yeast natural fermentation allows this wine to have a particular sense of place. It needs a bit of age so I recommend laying it down for at least one year.

Kingston Vineyards 2015 Sabino Chardonnay

Kingston Vineyards 2015 Sabino Chardonnay

The Kingston Vineyards Cariblanco Sauvignon blanc has a combination of Native and inoculated yeast used in the fermentation process. The wine is finished in steel tanks where it undergoes partial malolactic fermentation, helping to settle the acidity. Cariblanco is a horse that resides at the vineyard too, his face is a stunning white!

Kingston Vineyards 2016 Cariblanco Sauvignon blanc

Kingston Vineyards 2016 Cariblanco Sauvignon blanc

The wines I have selected today are of exceptional quality and value. I recommend the Kingston Vineyards wines to you.

From my table to yours,

Hand Of God Wines on The Tasting Room

Hand of God Wines on The Tasting Room with WineGuyMike. The Tasting Room is a weekly live broadcast on KFGM 105.5 FM radio and live stream online from 12:00 – 1:00MST.  Today I will be sharing two very special wines from the Uco Valley wine appellation in Argentina.

Live Stream from 12:00 – 1:00MST right here; http://tunein.com/radio/KFGM—Missoula-Community-Radio-s288054/?utm_source=tiEmbed&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=s288054

ABC Montana TV Feature with Hand of God Wines;

The term Hand of God Moment is so profound and endearing that every Argentinean is intimately familiar with it.  This term is not used lightly, in fact, it is a term that is sacred for this South American culture. In 1986 during the finals of the World Cup Soccer Tournament Argentina was competing against England and the game was tied at 1-1, that was a teammate of Diego Maradona who was at that time revered just as David Beckham is today, kicked the soccer ball to Maradona who lunged with his head and couldn’t reach the ball except with his fist.

Maradona thrust his fist toward the ball guiding it past the goalie and into the goal and winning the game for Argentina.  This play is known as “The Hand of God Moment” is forever ingrained in the minds of the Argentineans as the thrill of victory and for England the agony of defeat.

For two Stanford alums enjoying a glass of wine or two together, it became the.ir personal Hand of God moment.  Jon Staenberg, a.k.a “El Jefe”, and Santiago Achával, a.k.a “Master of Malbec” dubbed by The Wine Spectator magazine, this was their special moment, the moment when inspiration, friendship, and passion intersected as one.  This was there Hand of God moment, it was also the beginning of Hand of God Wines in the Mendoza appellation of Argentina.

These two Stanford alums met as they studied business at Stanford University.  After school both of these men went their own ways, Santiago as an entrepreneur who enjoyed success in the cement business in Argentina and Jon who is also an interesting entrepreneur in the field of technology, spending the bulk of his career with a little company called Microsoft.

It was on a trip to visit Argentina that Jon decided to look up Santiago and have a glass of wine together.  It was this Hand of God reunion that over a glass of wine or two that the passion and love for wine resulted in a winery in Argentina which produces the Hand of God Wines.

Staenberg is the owner and proprietor and Achával is the winemaker.  This is a partnership made in heaven hence the name Hand of God Wines.  When anything happens that is special and perhaps other worldly this is when the Argentineans look to the heavens and make reference to a Hand of God moment.

Thankfully for you and I, the wine drinker, this divine intervention came to be in the form of Hand of God Wines.  Vineyard land in Mendoza is 150 times less to purchase than land in the Napa Valley of California and it is also land that is in Achával’s soul.  This is where he is from, this is what he loves and calls home, and for WineGuyMike this is also a component of terroir, a true sense of place.

South American vineyard land can be very special, just look at Chile and Argentina, very different yet both produce very good wine in the hands of a skilled winemaker such as Santiago Achával.  The location is everything and after an exhaustive search, Staenberg and Achával found two perfect vineyards in which they now produce world-class wines.  A third white wine that I know will be equally as impressive is on its way very soon.

 

 

Hand of God Wines is a boutique winery that produces hand crafted wines that of exceptional quality.  When Wine Spectator magazine referred to Achával as “The Master of Malbec” they were not exaggerating.  The wines he is making at Hand of God Wines are so important to the world because it is an acknowledgment of the quality of land and soil composition, elevation of land, climate, prevailing wind patterns, and pristine alpine water that bless this land.  This is what Achával brings to the world as a gift in the form of a bottle of wine that exemplifies terroir of two very special vineyards in Mendoza, Argentina.

Valle de Uco, Appellation Mendoza, Argentina

The Hand of God vineyards is located a little over sixty miles from one another.  The Stolen Horse Vineyard is an old vine Malbec property with vines nearing 100 years of age.  This vineyard produces fruit with a complexity and quality that that only aged vines are able.  The fruit in this vineyard is intense, concentrated, with, layers of flavor and aroma, that which only can be produced from old vine fruit.

The 2010 vintage of Old Vine Malbec from Stolen Horse Vineyard is extremely well made featuring structure, balance, and restraint which is difficult in a wine this powerful.  This wine can be enjoyed now if decanted for an hour giving it a twirl in the decanter a couple times during that time.

2010 Old Vine Malbec

This wine like a great Bordeaux or a Beckstoffer To Kalon wine from California will be best in 5 years but is so well made can be laid down for 15-25 years.  I hope I live that long because I do want to taste this very special wine then.

Stolen Horse Vineyard

Stolen Horse Vineyard

This bottle of wine is perfectly balanced with fruit, acid, and tannin.  The minerality and earthen quality are terrific but for me, I love what the French refer to as anime, a meat like quality that makes this wine particularly special.  This wine is so good that honestly should only be paired with quality dry aged beef or Elk, it is just that good.

The second wine that Achával has crafted for the Hand of God Wines is a red blend wine that is so uncommon to Argentina that I dare call it a rarity.  The 2010 Fingerprint Series Red Wine is a French Style Rhone blend that is ready to go now.

2011 Fingerprint Series Red Wine

2011 Fingerprint Series Red Wine

This wine is fluid and elegant, honestly better than most Rhone wine available in the United States.  This blend is 55% Malbec, 35% Syrah, and 10% Petit Verdot and is beautiful on the nose and the palate.  The finish leaves you in thought, wondering just what this vineyard looks like as it is still horse plowed and fruit that is hand harvested.  This is why both of these treasures from Achával are so individual and thought to provoke.  This is not common wine, this is special and it is important to share wines that in a world of so much commonality amongst wines that there are some that are so distinct that they stand alone.  This is the wine that Santiago Achával makes and I thank him for that.

Sobremesa Vineyard

This wine is so synonymous when paired with Wild Game, Wild Fowl, Grilled Chicken, and just perfect with well-marbled meats.  Well-made sauces for any of these entrees would also complement perfectly.  This wine is concentrated with fruit yet is so delicate, delicious aroma and layer upon layer of flavor are revealed with an understated dusting of fine white pepper.  A finish that begs for more.

Hand of God Wines are not only lovely they are provoking and I have been so fortunate to taste the nectar of God, this was my Hand of God moment.  Thank you, Jon Staenberg and Santiago Achával for your passion and commitment to do something very special.

Visit www.WineGuyMike.com to learn more, please subscribe to my blog an newsletter while visiting my site so you get my weekly updates.

From my table to yours,

 

 

CELEBRATE SPRING WINE EVENT WITH WINEGUYMIKE

Hope Springs Eternal, “Winter Is Dead.” Celebrate Spring Wine Event With WineGuyMike

Wine Guy Mike Event

Join WineGuyMike for a Spring celebration wine tasting. Scratch Catering will be presenting delicious Charcuterie and cheese selections.

Celebrate with a flight of 5 distinct wines of character and world class cured meats and organic cheese selections.


Wine Guy Mike Event

March 23rd, 2017 6:30pm-9:00pm  Katie O’Keefe’s 2100 Stephens Ave, Missoula, Montana 59801

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Tickets are available by contacting WineGuyMike at 406.370.7162 or email mike@wineguymike.com – tickets are $25.00 each, space is limited and must be reserved no later than 03/22/2016

From my table to yours,